Dell’s latest 10 inch tablets come with a choice of Windows or Android, detachable keyboards that let you use the tablets as notebooks, and a Wacom digitizer with support for an optional digital pen.

We had a pretty good idea that the Dell Venue 10 Android tablet and Venue 10 Pro Windows model were on the way. Now Dell has officially unveiled both tablets. They’re aimed at the education market, but they should be available for anyone to buy.

dell venue 10 pro

The Venue 10 will ship with Android 5.0, while the Venue 10 Pro will come with Windows 8.1. Both will be available with HD or Full HD displays, and each will support NFC wireless communication.

The keyboard dock has a reversible hinge, which lets you use the tablets in notebook mode or flip the screen around and use the dock more like a kickstand.

Other features include 802.11ac WiFi, USB 3.0, micro HDMI, microSD card slots, a 38 Wh battery for up to 10 hours of run time, 2GB of RAM, and 64GB to 256GB of storage.

Dell will offer the Windows model first. It launches March 3rd and the tablet alone will cost $330 while the tablet plus keyboard will sell for $380.

Those prices are particularly good when you consider that the Venue 10 Pro is expected to ship with an Intel Core M Broadwell processor rather than an Intel Atom Bay Trail processor (which is much more common among low-cost tablets).

Update: It turns out the Venue 10 will have a Bay Trail processor after all. Only the Dell Venue 11 Pro will have a Core M chip. Thanks for the update, Trekkie!

dell venue 10

The Venue 10 Android tablet will be available this spring. Dell hasn’t announced pricing for the Android version yet. It’ll probably be cheaper than the Windows model though, since the Venue 10 is expected to feature an Intel Bay Trail CPU.

via Tom’s Hardware and AnandTech



Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

19 replies on “Dell launches 10 inch Android, Windows tablets for education (updated)”

  1. Is it just me or is Dell really producing better products now that its private? XPS 13 … and this – while not as lustworthy – is nice (Core M) for the price.

  2. Wow, did they go back to the drawing board on this one? 2 weeks ago it was going to be a Z3735F, and their same Synaptics stylus. Now its a Core M, and a Wacom? Maybe I’m confusing devices here.

    This looks pretty close to my ideal Windows tablet. I really like the placement of the stereo speakers, and the full-size USB 3.0 on the tablet itself is a big plus. I’m definitely interested in seeing a price on the 1920×1200 version. I presume the $330 price is the 1280×800 model.

    It doesn’t looks like the keyboard offers any extra inputs. Full size SD, and ethernet would have been nice.

    I’m a little concerned about the lack of heft in the keyboard, and the size of the hinge. The hinge looks like it lifts the rear of the keyboard up a good several centimeters. Looks like if I was resting my palms on it too heavily, the keyboard might slide and affect the angle of the hinge. We’ll see.

    1. Another observation is that it is very encouraging that Dell is positioning this as an Education product. Maybe I’m placing too much faith in them, but it makes it sound like some thought was put into its durability.

    2. You mean the hinge life height is dependent on the angle of the hinge? Hmm yeah I can see a problem but normally you rest your palm on the end of the keyboard away from the hinge. And I’m sure these hinges are designed with a certain stiffness

    3. It never was a Synaptics stylus. It is a newer kind of Wacom stylus that also uses an AAAA battery. People assumed that just because it used a battery, it was the same Synaptics model. Fortunately, it isn’t.

      Plus, the leaked document never indicated that it was an Atom CPU. Someone in the TabletPCReview forums ( http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/threads/dell-venue-10-5055-pro-v10-5050.65375/ ) assumed it was that given the other listed specs (RAM, 1280X800 10″ screen), leading to Liliputing inaccurately citing it as a fact in the previous article. Before a day ago, no one actually knew what processor was on-board.

      1. You’re right, I suppose that was all based on alot of assumptions.

        If it uses an AAAA battery, maybe this is using the Wacom Intuos stylus, which needs the battery to offer angle-detection. I wonder if the standard Wacom features will still work without the battery?

  3. DOA,,,way to much,,tablets are slumping bad…..good luck anyway !!!let me know when they 99 buckaroos

    1. You’re right. I was sure Intel was going to have a hand in preventing Core M products from offering such low amounts of RAM.

      Intel was initially positioning the Core M chips as being the Broadwell replacement for the Core i3/i5/i7 Y-series CPUs. But its looking more like a Broadwell replacement for the Z3775/3795. Even Haswell Celeron-Y powered devices all had 4GB ram.

      With the reasonable price of this Dell Venue 10 Pro, I really can’t complain. It really just looks like a generous replacement for what might have been a Baytrail CPU.

      1. Breaking news! Unfortunately, this is only a Bay Trail powered product. There was a typo in the press release materials in which Dell mistakenly took specs from the Venue 11 Pro and placed it in the specifications listing for the Venue 10 Pro. See the AnandTech link for the details. So, consider this a product poised to compete with HP’s Pro Tablet 10 EE G1 which is also $350 and was released two weeks ago:

        http://www.anandtech.com/show/8974/dell-updates-education-solutions-with-new-chromebook-11-latitude-11-and-venue-1010-pro-offerings

        http://www.notebookcheck.net/HP-launches-a-new-education-focused-tablet.135031.0.html

        1. Wow, major screw up on Dell’s part. In that case, I wouldn’t even consider buying this.

    2. Yes, it’s unfortunate that it has only 2 GB of RAM for a Core M device. Quite surprising Dell chose to do this. Hopefully, there’s a higher RAM option when configuring without charging excessive amounts for it.

  4. I hope this is better than my dell venue 11 pro. So many issues with screen, bios, and drivers. I am having so many blue screens of death now I can’t even use it

  5. I was excited reading specs until I hit the RAM part…
    Why, oh why no 4Gb yet?! Sure, its expensive, but not THAT expensive not to offer it!
    With so many 2Gb WIN tablets out there I see no reason to upgrade in coming year and half!

  6. Oh my. This could be wonderful for an Ubuntu/Linux tablet.

    Hoping to see someone install KDE Plasma Active on it. Might just pick one up and do it myself!

    1. don’t count on it.
      The UEFI (replacing the old bios system on the new Core M Broadwell processor) and OS will probably be a 32 bit, and at the moment all Linux distros support only UEFI 64 bit.

  7. Breaking news!! Unfortunately, this is only a Bay Trail powered product. There was a typo in the press release materials in which Dell mistakenly took specs from the Venue 11 Pro and placed it in the specifications listing for the Venue 10 Pro. See the AnandTech link for the details. So, consider this a product poised to compete with HP’s Pro Tablet 10 EE G1 which is also $350 and was released two weeks ago:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/8974/dell-updates-education-solutions-with-new-chromebook-11-latitude-11-and-venue-1010-pro-offerings

    http://www.notebookcheck.net/HP-launches-a-new-education-focused-tablet.135031.0.html

Comments are closed.