Intel WiDi is a wireless display technology that lets you beam content from recent Intel-powered devices to a TV or monitor without an HDMI cable.

WiDi has been available for a few years, but with the launch of Intel’s 5th-gen Core and Intel Core M processors, the chip maker is unveiling WiDi v5.1 for Windows 7 and later.

intel widi

The update brings support for security, privacy, and presenter controls for use in business environments as well as support for full-screen games using DirectX 9 and DirectX 11.

If you’re using a system with a 5th-gen Intel Core chip, you can also now use WiDi to send 4K Ultra HD content to an external display wirelessly, although you’ll need a driver update which is coming this month to support 4K content.

There’s also a WiDi remote application for Windows that lets you clone or extend your PC display.

Intel is also announcing one of the smallest, most affordable WiDi adapters to date. The ActionTech Mini2 is an HDMI stick that you can plug right into the HDMI port on your TV or monitor. It has a suggested retail price of $40, allowing you to turn pretty much any screen with an HDMI port into a wireless external display for your notebook or tablet.

At that price, the WiDi adapter is actually a little more expensive than a Chromecast or Amazon Fire TV Stick, but neither of those devices supports 4K (or are designed for use specifically with Intel and Windows products).

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

8 replies on “Intel announces Wireless Display improvements, $40 WiDi adapter”

  1. Disappointed. Would much rather have a WiGiG Display stick. WiDi old teck.

  2. The things that needed most work were range and stability. 4K support is nice.

  3. Hmm… would this work with a Dell Venue 8 Pro? I’ve tried several wireless display sticks, but most of them were a huge disappointment so far.

        1. What about “wih dee”, which sounds like “witty”? If you wanted to just base it on the original words, it would be “why dih”. That sounds awful which is probably why Wireless Fidelity became pronounced as “why fai”. I guess Intel’s using the same system. “Wih dee” still sounds off, so I suggest “why dee” as it’s easier to say and sounds better.

          * Note: ‘ih’ is used here to represent the sound made by the i in ‘pit’.

  4. the windows specific part seems to be an issue which intel probably screwed up…

Comments are closed.