Once upon a time Palm was a leading company in the mobile device space. Then Palm lost some serious market share, tried some new things that didn’t go over too well, and was eventually acquired by HP… who then canceled all Palm-related projects and dismantled the team before selling most of the remaining assets to LG, which uses them for smart TVs.

The full story’s a lot more complicated, but the point is that it’s been a few years since you’ve been able to buy a mobile device with PalmOS or webOS software. But maybe that’s going to change… because a visit to Palm.com now redirects to mynewpalm.com and an old Palm logo.

palm soon

Update: There’s also some evidence to suggest that TCL may be the company reviving the Palm name. 

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17 replies on “Lilbits (12-19-2014): Return of the Palm?”

  1. I’m still using a Palm TX to keep track of all kinds of notes, lists and contacts for work, personal etc. Love the stylus. Use it alongside a Blackberry phone which is less fun.

  2. I loved the Sony Clie’ line of Palm OS handhelds.
    The TH55 was ahead of its time.

  3. Well, I think they will have a tough time trying to grab a piece of the market these days.

    So they’re thirsty for more? Good Luck Palm.

    1. This ain’t ‘Palm.’ Palm is dead. This is like when you see old names in discount stores like Zenith that have been in the grave for decades, the trademark got sold to some anonymous Chinese outfit and they stick it on over the unpronouncable noname the stuff would have sold under. You can bet the rent money it won’t even run any descendant of PalmOS. I’d bet on Android.

      1. Historically speaking we should probably be thankful for that.
        Towards the end Palm seemed to always mess ONE thing up. Something technical, something in the software. Something.
        R.I.P. Palm.

    1. Graffiti!

      The new Samsung Galaxy Note comes with kinda stylus, pressure-detection, precise position, try it at local store, it’s pretty okay.

    1. He’s a spammer who has been trying to leave comments telling you to buy tablets from his store. He’s been unhappy with my efforts to delete his posts and block his username/email (so he keeps popping up with new accounts).

      1. Keep whackin’ that mole, Brad-san. I don’t know what he said about you (comment deleted), but we don’t want his kind here any more than you do.

        And I remember the nightmare that was Palm/Mac synch toward the end… Can’t tell you how relieved I was to get “only one company to blame for problems” vertically integrated synch when the iPhone came out; took Apple awhile to get it stable (though I never had the MobileMe blues as bad as many), but it was better than my rickety Palm toolchain from day one. As noted, of course, this likely has nothing to do with “My New Palm.”

  4. There was a Palm OS (not webOS) emulator for iOS, and Android as I just discovered. Maybe they could package that into an Android device.

    Edit: It was called StyleTap.. but it’s $50… I can buy three (maybe more?) used Palm OS devices for that.

    There’s a cheaper 68k based Android emulator (PHEM), for $1

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