As expected, Lenovo is expanding the line of Yoga 2 tablets it unveiled earlier in October with a new model featuring a 13 inch display and Windows 8.1 software.

The new Yoga 13 inch Tablet 2 launches in early November for $700.

lenovo yoga tablet 2 13

Like other Yoga 2 models, the new tablet features an Intel Atom Z3745 Bay Trail processor, a big battery (for up to 15 hours of run time), and a built-in kickstand that lets you prop up the tablet when you’re not holding it.

The tablet has a 13.3 inch, 2560 x 1440 pixel display, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage, and 1.5W stereo speakers plus a 5W subwoofer.

In a lot of ways, the 13 inch Windows tablet is similar to the Yoga Tablet 2 Pro. But that model sells for $500, runs Android, and has a built-in projector — but the Android model has only half the RAM and half the storage of the Windows model.

We’re living in odd times though, when Lenovo calls its $500 Android tablet the Yoga 2 Pro, while its Windows model is just called the 13 inch Yoga 2. Or you could just buy the Lenovo Yoga Pro 3, which is a Windows 2-in-1 ultrabook/tablet convertible with a built-in keyboard and an Intel Core M processor.

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17 replies on “Lenovo Tablet 2 family gets a 13 inch Windows model”

  1. This could be really great, for $100 less, running some other OS besides Windows 8 Metro Tiles!

    1. They’re not releasing that detail but in general, for Windows systems, the 4GB RAM suggests it should be configured with 64bit OS/UEFI… While for Android, we’ll have to see as they’re not waiting for large RAM capacities before they start pushing 64bit…

      1. I know baytrail is 64 capable but don’t remember ever seeing one b4

        1. The RAM is the main limiter… They opt for 32bit if it’s below 4GB but switch to 64bit as soon as it’s 4GB or higher… It’s just that unlike BIOS that UEFI is tied at the hip to the OS and they both need to be the same version and that limits upgrade-ability…

          For another example, the Asus Transformer T200 just came out with a version with 4GB of RAM and it’s definitely 64bit with both 64bit W8 and 64bit UEFI in the official specs…

          1. ok cool

            Subject: Re: New comment posted on Lenovo Tablet 2 family gets a 13 inch Windows model

  2. Can someone tell me if these fancy mostly-tablet convertibles can actually be used as laptops, sitting on your lap?

    Looking at the pictures of different “modes” on Lenovo’s site, you never see someone with it on their lap – when they’re using it as a laptop, it’s always on a flat desk or table.

    1. I wouldn’t recommend it… the part that helps stand it up isn’t that large and you need something pretty stable to use reliably on your lap but is fine for table usage…

      A convertible or 2 in 1 with a full Keyboard Dock, like the Asus Transformer T-Series has, would be more ideal for lap usage…

  3. “Z7345” ? I think it might be a typo for Z3745. Anyway, it’s a impulse buy piece of garbage, for the uninformed customers browsing big box stores and saying… “uuu, let’s get that bigger one for $700” which, to them, makes sense if the smaller one is $200. How the fuck dare they, price a $150 Bay Trail parts assembly for $700! Lack of flagrant shamelessness in pricing, is the only reason the Chinese brands are even relevant in today’s market. They think hiding behind the veneer of a 1990’s brand, discarded by IBM, is the way to flushing cheap shit with a nice case, to the upmarket crowd ? I might as well buy a F* Phillips or a Siemens, and enjoy how 70% of what I pay for, goes to a fat double digit margin, while I stand there, with shit in my hands and look at what a pretty logo it has.

    1. Apparently you didn’t see the screen res.
      Lenovo usually costs more than others, but with specs like these and provided that the keyboard is included, the price is pretty much justified.

      Though a 550-650 price point would be easier to stomach.

  4. Interesting. No projector.
    While MS has gone to giving away its software/services in an attempt to gain some market share against Android/ChromeOS (which should work) that leaves slightly more expensive products with this jarring notion of “Why does that Windows version cost more? I can buy the same tablet for $200 in Windows or Andriod and even get Office 365 with unlimited cloud storage. But this more expensive tablet cost quite a bit more on Windows than for the Android version and doesn’t come with Office or the storage.”
    They are creating some extremely odd market dynamics. It will be fascinating to watch this play out over the next couple years. They will undoubtedly gain some market share in the lower end. But it seems like they are going to teach consumers to be offended at the notion of having to pay for MS software/services.
    It’s also fascinating that Intel has managed to get these Bay Trail chips – typically quite similar if not identical – in machines ranging from like $100 to $700 in price.
    Personally I want the Android model – but with an Nvidia Denver K1 and a stylus. Also straight unskinned Android. They can keep the projector in exchange.

    1. The problem here is MS and Intel subsidies.

      Office 2013 / 365 licenses can only be gotten free of charge for the manufacturer if bundled with devices under 11 inches, Win8.1+Bing is only free of charge for devices below 9 inches, otherwise it has reduced but still existent licensing fees. Intel is footing the BoM (Bill of Materials) differences as well as helping with device engineering costs for tablets where you would typically see ARM chips otherwise.

      This means we get used to dirt cheap 7 – 10.9 inch devices with Window (and possibly Office) that have been subsidized to hell and back again, and then scoff at the audacity manufacturers have for charging noticeably more than a bigger screen can account for, on devices where none of those subsidies apply.

  5. Too expensive, should of made it $500, if it would of had a more powerful processor instead of atom it would be ok at $700, but $700 for intel atom tablet is not going to cut it. My i3 dell venue 11 pro cost me $600 with keyboard

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