Intel is releasing a new set of tools that developers can use to create apps designed to run on both Windows and android.

The Intel Integrated Native Developer Experience 2015 toolkit (INDE) includes libraries, compilers, setup, debugging, and optimization tools, among other things.

inde

Developers can use the tools to target Windows or Android… or both. That makes sense since phones, tablets, and PCs with Intel chips can now run either Windows or Android. But the Intel INDE tools can be used to develop apps that will run on ARM chips as well as Intel processors.

The tools help developers create, test, and optimize apps using C++ and Java, and since the same toolkit can be used for Windows and Android apps, it can save developers of cross-platform apps the time and money it would take to use separate tools for each build of their software.

Intel’s INDE software runs on Windows 7 or later or Apple OS X 10.9 or later and supports development of apps for Android 4.3 or later on ARM or Intel architecture or for Windows 7 through Windows 8.1.

There’s a free Starter Edition, as well as Professional and Ultimate Editions which are priced at $299 and $799, respectively.

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6 replies on “Intel offers new dev tools for cross-platform Windows, Android apps”

  1. Can’t wait for the version that integrates aith AIDE. Develop for Windows on Android!

  2. Way to finally play both sides.
    Dummies should not have waited so long.

  3. “run on both Windows and android.”
    Woah o.O? This for real? And for both ARM + Intel chips too?

      1. Windows 7 support seems to mean “really” on Windows too, i.e. not limited to the unpopular WinRT layer with its restrictive deployment model.

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