Small form-factor PC maker Shuttle is launching its first little PCs powered by ARM-based processors and Google Android software. The company unveiled the Shuttle DSA2LS earlier this year, but now Shuttle has announced that it’s available in Europe for a suggested retail price of 158 Euros (including VAT).

That’s about $210 US, but it’ll likely be cheaper in the States since taxes won’t be included in the list price.

shuttle_01

The Shuttle DSA2LS is a little desktop computer that measures 7.5″ x 5.6″ x 1.4″ and features a Freescale i.MX6 dual-core ARM Cortex-A9 processor, 1GB of RAM, 4GB of flash storage and an SDHC card reader for up to 64GB of removable storage.

It has HDMI and VGA ports, 4 USB 2.0 ports, Ethernet, and an RS-232 serial port for use in commercial and enterprise environments.

The system runs Google Android 4.2 Jelly Bean software and Shuttle is positioning it as a media player for digital signage or a system that can be used for automation, point-of-sales operations or other business uses. In other words, while you could pick up this little guy and use it in your home, it’s not really designed for home use.

That’s just as well, since there are significantly cheaper Android mini PCs available for use in the home. But it’s interesting to see one of the early players in the tiny PC space enter the ARM-based mini PC space.

via Shuttle and AndroidPC.es

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

10 replies on “Shuttle launches its first Android, ARM-based computers”

  1. Basically a CuBox-i2, which sells for $89.99, and has a ton of support from the open source community.

      1. “Like the article states, it’s not for regular consumers… ”
        My money is no good to them… they wanna sell it ONLY to upper class lol =))
        They have to reinvent the wheel. There are so many projects (like wandboard and cubox-i that offer more for less money), why can’t they buy the IP from them and use them as a base for their products, improving the software also.

Comments are closed.