There are a growing number of Android tablets with Intel Atom processors. But LG’s going a bit higher up the food chain with its new Tab Book 11.

It’s an 11.6 inch Andorid tablet with an Intel Core i5 Haswell processor and a built-in keyboard that lets you use the system like a notebook… an Android-powered notebook.

lg tab book 11

Unveiled in Korea, the new LG Tab Book features a 1920 x 1080 pixel IPS display, a Core i5-4200U processor, Intel HD 4400 graphics, 4GB of RAM, and a 128GB solid state drive.

It features 2 USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port, micro SD card reader, and Android 4.2 Jelly Bean software.

The LG Tab Book tablet measures 11.2″ x 7.6″ x 0.66″ and weighs 2.3 pounds. If that seems kind of heavy for a tablet, that’s because the keyboard isn’t detachable: it’s built into the tablet and tucks away behind the screen when not in use.

All told, the Tab Book has the guts of a decent Windows tablet or ultrabook. It just happens to ship with Android instead of Windows.

In fact, LG already has a Windows version of this machine. It’s called the Tab Book2 and it also has a full HD display, a keyboard that slides out from behind the system, and an Intel Haswell processor. LG introduced the Tab Book2 Windows slider at the Consumer Electronics Show in January.

via Juggly

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9 replies on “LG unveils Tab Book Android convertible with Intel Core i5”

  1. Waiiiiiiiiiit a sec.

    So this is Android on intel, basically what the consoleos people are doing, native? Much better than bluestacks / andy or other qemu style emulators… not an atom processor.. You should snap one of these up and see what the performance is actually like, I would be pretty interested in real world and antutu scores.

  2. What the hell?
    Why would anyone want such a high piece of hardware with Android 4.2? Hell, it doesn’t even support fstrim… O_o

    1. Could be similar to the purpose of the Chromebook Pixel… a high end platform mainly for developers to help push the platform towards productivity apps, something you need actual performance to even try and prepare the way for more productivity orientated usages…

      Mind, they’re starting to try to push Android for laptops and desktops but in order to really be useful on those they need to evolve the platform beyond its mobile roots…

      Whether they’ll succeed is another consideration, I personally don’t think so but you never know…

      But we are suppose to start seeing Intel Core M based devices start coming out next year in mid range devices and that’ll start pushing the performance of tablet devices and Android will either evolve along with that increasing available performance or we’ll start seeing W8 start getting an advantage going forward…

      With MS eventually going to merge all three versions of their OS from mobile to desktop, flexibility will seem to be where future competition will lay and all platforms will either need to evolve or start falling behind…

      1. All the more reason NOT to use an old version of Android with big differences at the basic functionality level.
        I don’t question the hardware, only the match between the chosen hardware and software.

        1. 4.2 is still relevant and not really that old yet… You’re not going to be running any apps in 4.4 that you can’t also run on 4.2…

          Besides, the difference in hardware performance more than makes up for anything in the software as a Core i5 is multiple times more powerful than any ARM SoC… Also, the latest releases aren’t usually very stable or have the range of compatibility as older releases that are more vetted…

          Running natively on x86 does require changes from the usual release and most x86 support up till now has been limited to Intel’s mobile SoCs, which this system most definitely won’t be using… and thus that has to be accounted for…

          Mind, custom Android releases tend to lag months behind the mainstream Google releases and this is likely an even harder port…

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