Amazon Prime Music launched this week, giving subscribers access to a million songs as part of their regular Amazon Prime membership. While the catalog isn’t as big as that of rivals Spotify or Rdio, it probably doesn’t have to be: Prime Music is more of a perk for existing subscribers than a full-fledged, standalone music service.

For $99 per year, Prime subscribers get access to a selection of streaming movies and TV shows, songs and albums from popular and obscure artists, the ability to borrow up to one eBook per month, and free 2-day shipping on millions of physical items.

Can’t find free versions of the songs, movies, or eBooks you want in the Prime library? No problem… you can probably buy them from Amazon… the company uses Prime to hook you on its services so it can sell you more stuff. But I’m OK with that, since for $99 per year Amazon offers some of the best features of Netflix, Spotify, and Oyster and even if it doesn’t have the same selection of content, there’s plenty of stuff worth watching, listening to, or reading.

want

You can’t always get what you want (like the Rolling Stones version of the iconic song), but if you try sometimes, you might find… you get something, like a selection of covers of the tune. Or you could just browse the Prime library for music from artists you actually do want to hear.

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5 replies on “Lilbits (6-13-2014): You can’t always get what you want (on Amazon Prime Music)”

  1. “Sorry, this content is not available in your region, We have too many Lawyers and they won’t let us take all the money you want to give us. So just stop bothering us and go somewhere else and pirate the content.”

  2. Is the ‘cant’ in the headline meant to be a pun? If so, I don’t get it. Maybe just a glaring typo.

  3. I love Prime. I got it for the free 2 day shipping, I enjoy the free movies and music. How can anyone complain about the value added to this wonderful package?

    It’s only getting better too. If they can improve the Music app on Windows and Android and add some more music to their Prime catalog (which they are doing). Spotify may have to watch out. Likewise, if they were able to get more movies and tv series, make some good TV series and improve on the apps in their respective environments (and ffs add an app for Windows and Android) then I’d probably be able to save $8 on Netflix.

    As it is though, it’s 3rd in line for me on all fronts. I use Spotify, then Google Music then Prime Music for Music and Netflix then Hulu then Prime Video for Movies and TV. No complaints here. Whatever Netflix and Hulu don’t have, I generally find on Prime and if I somehow have issues with Spotify or Google Music, Prime will be there to back me up.

  4. Too bad Amazon’s 2 day shipping sometimes becomes 3-4 business day shipping especially outside the US. Time from order to ship sometimes takes longer too.

    For those who don’t use the other “free” perks, Prime is becoming not a worthwhile purchase.

    1. They should have a cheaper shipping only service. Too bad it may seem like they’re nickel and diming people with such and a la carte type pricing but it’d still be better for those who don’t use these other services.

      It just seems like you’re paying for things you didn’t want. If all these services are worth $100 then free 2 day shipping must be worth less. Amazon isn’t a charity.

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