Asus appears to be expanding its line of Transformer Book 2-in-1 tablet/laptop hybrids with a new model featuring and 11.6 inch display. The company’s Transformer Book T100 is a 10 inch tablet that turns into a notebook when you add a keyboard, and the Transformer Book T300 is a 13 inch model that does the same.

Now the folks at Mobile Geeks have spotted a retail listing for a new 11.6 inch model called the Asus T200TA.

asus logo

The computer has an 11.6 inch display, Windows 8.1 software, 2GB of RAM, and at least 32GB of flash storage. It’s powered by an Intel Atom Z3775 Bay Trail processor and sells for about 349 Euros before taxes.

The specs are similar to those for the entry-level 10 inch model, so it seems likely there may be a higher-priced model with 64GB of storage. Some models in the Asus Transformer line of devices also include hard drives or extra batteries in the keyboard. It’s not clear if the company plans to offer those options for the 11.6 inch Asus Transformer Book T200 series.

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20 replies on “Asus Transformer Book T200A could be an 11.6 inch 2-in-1”

  1. I’m hoping to see a consumer oriented Bay Trail notebook with a 10″ screen and 4 GB of RAM. There’re only announced/leaked business devices that may have 4 GB after an unknown period from their initial release. Since they’re business devices, they’re more expensive due to things I don’t even want so I’d like other options.

    1. Even 3 GB of RAM would be better than 2 GB. Also, anyone with inside info on the status of 64-bit capable UEFI firmware for notebooks/tablets and 64-bit Bay Trail T drivers for Windows 8?

      1. Unfortunately, while they can already offer these updates, it’s up to the system makers whether it is implemented and they likely won’t start doing that until they start offing devices with at least 4GB of RAM…

      2. Ya, does anyone know what the status is on those 64-bit Bay Trail T drivers?

    1. It’s a combinations of factors…

      1) Mobile Market requires the use of mobile parts and the industry standard for mobile parts has yet to really expand capacity beyond 2GB without significantly raising costs… This will change but we’re still at the transition point for that to happen and it’ll be closer to end of the year before we see many models offered with it…

      2) Mobile devices also require minimizing of power usage and presently the LP-DDR3 RAM isn’t efficient enough to avoid a rise in power consumption with increased capacity… So some are waiting for the transition to LP-DDR4 RAM that’ll start next year…

      Mind, even ARM devices are being performance throttled to preserve battery life and prevent over heating as passive cooling is very limited and it’s all too easy to generate heat too quickly…

      3) The way the mobile market is structures basically has things like capacity used to justify pricing to provide better profit margins for companies making the products…

      Like the lowest capacity Nexus device is sold near actual BOM cost but the models that offer extra eMMC storage capacity charge a lot more than the extra memory actually costs and its through those purchases that the companies make the most profits… Like charging $50 to increase storage from 8GB to 16GB but it really only cost them an additional $8 BOM to provide that capacity increase…

      So, it’s hard for them to offer more without effecting that system as people are only willing to pay so much of a premium and most of these are intended as budget devices…

      Though, the worst abusers of this system is Apple… for every doubling of capacity for the iPad Air they charge an additional $100… So you can wind up paying more for an iPad than a MS Surface Pro 2, even with similar capacity…

      4) You could avoid this limitation by getting a non-mobile SoC… Like the Bay Trail M/D models that are sold under Celeron/Pentium branding… as those are configured more like regular PC’s with PC parts like DDR3L RAM modules and they support up to 8GB of RAM…

      But those lack mobile optimization, have higher SDPs and TDPs, and will tend to cost a bit more but less than a Premium Business model tablet…

      Though, avoid the first model releases as only the latest model releases have the higher thermal tolerances and features like Quick Sync enabled… Since, features like Quick Sync or normally always disabled for all Celeron/Pentium models but Intel recently decided to give the Bay Trail models a little edge and enabled it for the latest model releases…

      1. Thank you so much for the full explanation. Your comment should be an article on this website to clear things up!

    1. LoL I see a comment like yours every time a new tablet/convertible is posted! I guess you won’t be getting one then.

          1. Yeah I guess $299 for a Win8.1 tablet with wacom stylus is pretty steep…

          2. Indeed and that link has it for $567. I think you might have just accidentally sold me a tablet.

          3. That’s the older Clover Trail ATOM model… Modern Bay Trail ATOM has over twice the CPU and over triple the GPU performance of that model…

            Anyway, Zackery Ward was making a good point, WACOM digitizers tend to be cost prohibitive the larger you go as it costs a set amount per square inch of surface area…

            A good example to get an idea of how high they can go would be the WACOM Cintiq series, which except for the latest Companion series models are primarily just monitors with WACOM digitizer and dedicated buttons for extra functionality…

            Yet, despite being fairly basic the price range for them goes from $999 for the smallest model to $2999 for the largest…

            So, it’s a pretty hefty premium to add a WACOM digitizer and the cost scales up along with the size of the screen…

            This is why they’ve been trying to develop competing technologies like nTrig, which tries to save costs by merging the pen digitizer layer with the touch screen layer, which incidentally brings up the other issue with WACOM in that it adds an extra layer that makes it harder to keep tablets thin… and since it’s a active digitizer it means it’s constantly putting out a EM field when in use, which is why the pen doesn’t need a battery but means an extra load on system power reserves…

            WACOM is still the best for accuracy and range of features, though, and that’s one of the reasons why the alternatives haven’t gotten much traction in the market…

            While, even for a 10″ tablet, system makers are looking at up to around $100 extra to the BOM, not to mention design considerations for whether they would add a pen silo to hold the pen, which can bring up other compromises like thinner pens are easier to store in the device but means less sensitivity, etc. and larger pens may be harder to keep track of if they can’t be stored in the device or unreliably attached, like magnetically (MS Surface Pro/Pro2)…

            System makers often have to work on the driver support… WACOM itself can take months to add a new device to its driver support… All of which means even more costs to the system makers…

            So, they know people want them but it’s a bit of pain for them to add WACOM to their products unless it’s a premium range product that they can charge extra for to make it worth the trouble and costs…

          4. all I can say is if they make the Asus T100 Note and price it at about $500 then they have a winner IMHO…

          5. They could probably learn something from Samsung in that regard, despite their tendency to charge a premium the latest Samsung Note Pro models make excellent use of the WACOM technology…

            Like the pen actually works all the way to the edge of the screen, a issue with most other WACOM devices, and the WACOM digitizer turns on/off automatically with the removal or insertion of the pen from its storage slot to minimize any extra power drain… While Samsung provides pretty good app support for the pen too… It’s just a shame it’s an Android only model series… but shows what could be achieved with WACOM pen technology, if the company knows what it’s doing and is willing to put extra effort into the product…

            Asus did do a pretty good job with the Asus Vivotab Note 8 but it could still be better and of course there are people who would want it on a larger device…

  2. I would be interested to learn how heavy this will be. The original model is 1.3 lbs X2. If somehow this larger model was in the 1.5 lbs X2 range then I’d be interested. But I do not see a market for a 2lb tablet and 4 lbs lb convertible. It sort of starts to defeat the purpose.

    1. The Surface Pro weighs 2lb. But I agree with you to a point. I believe weight, cost, and features should be linear. I would accept a 2lb tablet if the features are there. If I am buying a sparsely featured tablet, chances are I am looking for lightweight.

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