Lenovo’s Flex line of laptops are notebooks with screens that can rotate 300 degrees until they face away from the keyboard instead of toward it. While the company’s Yoga devices feature 360 degree hinges that let you use the systems like tablets, Flex models are more like convertible laptops that you can use as an all-in-one desktop or presentation-style machine.

The company introduced its first Flex laptops in 2013, and now the company’s updating the lineup with the new Flex 2 series of laptops.

Lenovo Flex

The Lenovo Flex 2 comes with a 14 inch or 15.6 inch screen and a choice of black or silver case.

Both models will be available with up to an Intel Core i7 processor and optional NVIDIA GeForce graphics or with an AMD A8 processor and AMD Radeon R5 M230 discrete graphics. Lenovo will offer optional full HD displays, which suggests that entry-level models will have lower-resolution screens.

Lenovo’s Flex 2 laptops support up to 1TB of hard drive storage or a 256GB SSD, Dolby audio, and 720p webcams. Each model has a 10-point capacitive touchscreen display and Windows 8.1 software.

Prices for the 14 inch model will start at $799 while the larger 15.6 inch model will be available for as little as $429 when the laptops launch in June.

There’s no word on whether Lenovo will offer an update to its smallest Flex model, the Bay Trail-powered Lenovo Flex 10.

via Windows Blog

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One reply on “Lenovo doubles down on Flex with the Flex 2 laptops”

  1. The Flex line compares to the Yoga line the way mainstream 14″ and
    15″ laptops compare to ultrabooks. At first glance, the Flexes look
    to be bigger, heavier, and cheaper than the Yogas. Maybe it’s because
    there aren’t strong yet small, light, or inexpensive enough hinges that will
    allow a 14″ or 15″ laptop to rotate 360 degrees like a smaller Yoga laptop.

    Unfortunately, I’m disappointed by the paucity of ports in ultrabooks.
    Personally, I don’t really mind more girth and weight on a laptop, as
    long as I can have sufficient ports.

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