Chinese device maker ZTE plans to unveil several new smartphones at Mobile World Congress in Spain this month. One is a new Android phone with a 6 inch display called the ZTE Grand Memo II LTE.

The company will also launch an updated version of its first Firefox phone, the ZTE Open.

ZTE logo

ZTE is starting to make a habit of announcing upcoming announcements. The company teased us with plans for CES a few days ahead of the event, and now ZTE is taking a similar approach with MWC.

Full details won’t be available until closer to the show, but here’s what we know so far.

The ZTE Grand Memo II LTE will be an Android phone with a big screen and 4G capabilities, and it’ll have an “ultra slim” design. Meanwhile the ZTE Open C will run Firefox OS 1.3 with a new user interface called MiFavor 2.3.

ZTE hasn’t said anything about the display resolution, processor, or other specs for either phone. Most Firefox OS phones launched so far have been low-priced devices aimed at developing markets (or app developers).

There’s nothing stopping a company from releasing a high-end Firefox OS handset, but there’s a lot more competition in the high-end smartphone space at the moment. So it’s likely that the ZTE Open C will be a budget device… just like the original ZTE Open.

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One reply on “ZTE is bringing new Android, Firefox phones MWC 2014”

  1. I wish the mfrs would reserve terms like “Memo” for
    devices with an active digitizer. Wacom could have
    promoted itself by copyrighting the term, like Intel
    did with “ultrabook”. Wacom, you dropped the ball on
    this one.

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