You can already recharge the batteries on a number of smartphones and a handful of tablets without plugging in a charging cable. Soon you may be able to use wireless charging with laptops as well.

Dell has joined the Alliance for Wireless Power, making it the first major PC maker to throw its weight behind a wireless charging standard.

It’s too early to say that this means future Dell notebooks will support A4WP’s Rezence charging standard, but the odds look better today than they did yesterday.

Rezence

A4WP is also announcing a new high-power project to bring wireless charging for 20 to 50 watt products. That could be enough juice to charge ultrabooks, notebooks, and small appliances.

Rezence technology uses magnetic resonance charging which allows for you to send power greater distances than you would with Qi or Powermat systems. That means you can, for example, build a charging pad into a table and charge a phone even while it’s in a case, or charge a laptop even if there’s a tablecloth on the table.

It also allows you to charge multiple devices simultaneously using a single charging surface.

While wireless charging is pretty nifty (and could save your device’s ports from wear and tear) it’s not without its downsides. It currently takes far more power to charge a device without wires than it does when you use a cable. That’s because some percentage of the energy sent through the wireless charger is wasted before it gets to your device.

via Engadget

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2 replies on “Dell joins Alliance for Wireless Power: Wirelessly charge your laptop?”

  1. Funny, I was just reading an item that talked about industry worry over battery charging’s inefficiency as things are. Adding this to the mix will undo any attempts to optimize charging through smart charger circuits, since its inherent waste far outpaces any possible savings from smarter charge circuits.

  2. As long as I don’t get cancer then this is nice. Although, I’d much rather go with wired charging unless I’m charging at a public place where I’m not paying for the electricity directly (hmm, that Starbucks coffee keeps increasing in price). Wireless charging seems to be very innefficient. Has any environmentalists protested yet?

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