Acer is updating it’s 7.9 inch tablet line with the new Iconia A1-830, sporting an IPS display, an Intel Atom processor, and up to 7.5 hours of battery life.

The tablet is expected to launch in North America during the first quarter of 2014 for $149 and up.

Update: An earlier version of this article stated that the tablet would have a starting price of $180, but Acer has made a last-minute change and it will instead sell for $149 and up. 

Acer Iconia B1-830

The Acer Iconia A1-830 features a 1024 x 768 pixel LED display, an Intel Atom Z2560 Clover trail+ processor, 1GB of RAM, and 16GB of storage. There’s also a microSD card slot for up to 32GB of additional storage.

Acer’s new tablet features front and rear cameras, stereo speakers, 802.11n WiFi, Bluetooth 3.0, and Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean software.

The company also plans to offer accessories including a “Crunch Keyboard” that’s built into a faux-leather case, and a “Crunch Cover” which is a microfiber case that doubles as a stable stand.

The tablet measures 0.32 inches thick and weighs less than 14 ounces.



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4 replies on “Acer unveils $149 Iconia A1-830 with 7.9 inch screen”

  1. What are we paying the premium price for, the Intel SOC?
    I’m sorry to be that guy, but this one also doesn’t seem to be priced per what you are getting.

    1. This isn’t a bad price for an x86 Android tablet. It also makes the smart choice of a 4:3 display, making it more useful than widescreen devices as an e-reader and web browser in portrait mode. We’re looking at products that are evolving, and I’d expect the price to fall as vendors like Acer amortize the costs involved in the move to x86.

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