Straight Talk is MVNO, or mobile virtual network operator. That means the company acts like a phone company, but it actually sells you air time on someone else’s network — typically at a much lower price than you’d pay if you went straight through that larger network.

Up until recently, Straight Talk allowed customers a choice of “unlimited” data plans on AT&T or T-Mobile networks, but a little while ago the company ran out of AT&T SIM cards. Now they’re back, which means if you’re in an area where AT&T offers faster or more reliable coverage than T-Mobile you might be able to get yourself a $45 per month all-you-can-eat plan.

There are a few catches: Straight Talk supports HSPA+ but not LTE. And it calls its plans unlimited, but will actually start throttling your speeds if you go over a certain unspecified amount of data in a limited time. If you use less than a few hundred megabytes per day and less than 2GB of month, you can probably save a lot of money with this sort of carrier.

Straight Talk AT&T SIM card

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3 replies on “Lilbits (8-08-2013): Straight Talk AT&T SIM cards are back”

  1. Finally glad AT&T SIMs are back. I live in an area with very good coverage on all the major carriers – except T-Mobile. This is much nicer.

  2. I gave up on the Windows tablets and returned to Android. The apps for larger screens are getting better. However, there are still quite a few that say they are configured for tablets, yet are only stretched out versions of phone apps. We need developers to jump on the large screen bandwagon in order to get Android to be a serious threat to the iPad.

  3. For about a year I’ve been using StraightTalk on a Google Play version of the Galaxy Nexus and it’s been great. HSPA+ is plenty fast for me and even with pretty heavy usage I’ve only been throttled once. One thing: I’d like to see them offer a Nano SIM for use with phones like the iPhone 5 and the Moto X.

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