Sony will begin selling the Xperia Tablet Z in the US this spring. A 16GB model will run $499, while Sony will sell a 32GB model for $599.

Those prices are a bit high in the Android tablet world, but Sony’s tablets have a few features which help set them apart from the crowd.

Sony Xperia Tablet Z

First, the Sony Xperia Tablet Z has a high resolution 10.1 inch, 1920 x 1200 pixel display. Second, it has a dust and water resistant case.

And third, Sony is chasing the mostly symbolic title of “thinnest 10.1 inch tablet in the world.” Because let’s face it, how important is it to you have a tablet is 0.3 inches thick versus 0.27 inches thick?

That said, Sony’s new tablet really is one of the thinnest you’re likely to find, measuring 6.9mm, or about 0.27 inches thick. It weighs 495 grams, or about 1.1 pounds.

Under the hood it has a 1.5 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 quad-core processor and 2GB of RAM, WiFi, NFC, and an 8MP rear camera and 2MP front-facing camera.

The tablet also has an IR port and can be used as a universal remote control for your TV and other electronics.

Sony plans to launch the tablet with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, but promises to offer an Android 4.2 upgrade in the future.

Sony first introduced the Xperia Tablet Z last month, but the pricing and release time frame were unveiled at Mobile World Congress this week.

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One reply on “Sony Xperia Tablet Z coming this Spring for $499 and up”

  1. IR port is kinda cool. Makes you wonder, though, how long IR technology will stick around. Seems like ancient tech. How long before TV’s and such use bluetooth radio signals to communicate with remote controls that don’t require line-of-sight.

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