The Gumstix Waysmall Silverlode is a tiny, low power computer designed for commercial or industrial applications. But under the hood it’s running a version of Ubuntu Linux optimized by Linaro to run on ARM-based processors. So it could also theoretically find use as an inexpensive desktop computer or media center PC.

Waysmall Silverlode

The device is a low power computer with a sturdy aluminum case. It uses just 2.5W of power.

The Waysmall Silverlode features a 1 GHz TI Sitara AM3703 ARM Cortex-A8 processor, 512MB of memory and just 512MB of storage. There’s a microSD card slot for extra storage space. An 8GB microSD card also comes with the computer.

It also supports USB host and OTG capabilities, so you should be able to plug in an external hard drive.

While I wouldn’t replace an Alienware gaming rig with this little computer, it should be able to support basic computing tasks and HD video playback. There’s also a headphone jack, something which you won’t find on some mini PC devices such as the MK802.

On the other hand, the Waysmall Silverlode doesn’t have built-in WiFi. You’ll need an adapter if you want to use the device with a wireless network.

The computer features HDMI and DVI output and has a 10/100MB Ethernet jack for connecting to the internet.

via CNX Software

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3 replies on “Gumstix Waysmall Silverlode is a tiny PC with Ubuntu Linux”

  1. Not exactly suitable as a media center PC. In the video, Adam Lee states that the HDMI-port only supports 720p-output.

    1. What’s wrong with 720p? That’s high definition, as per ATSC broadcast standard.

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