Verizon’s new Share Everything Plans lets you pay for multiple phones, tablets, mobile hotspots with one single plan. It’s not exactly cheap — but it could be less expensive than buying separate data plans for all the smartphones and tablets in your household.

Verizon Share Everything

Here’s how it works.

  • First you pay a monthly fee for voice and text on each of the phones you want to use. That will run you $30 per basic phone or $40 per smartphone.
  • Then you pay a monthly fee for mobile hotspots or USB data sticks for notebooks.
  • Tack on another $10 for each tablet you want to use.
  • Finally, pay a monthly fee for a bucket of data that can be shared with up to 10 devices.

Smartphone users get unlimited voice and text while basic phone plans include unlimited text and 700 shared voice minutes.

Plans range from $50 per month for 1GB to $100 per month for 10GB.

Verizon Share Everything

In other words, if you have two smartphones, two tablets, and 6GB of shared data, your monthly bill will be about $180.

Previously you would have had to buy a separate plan for each device, which could easily lead to a much higher bill — although you also wouldn’t have to worry about your spouse or children using up all of your month’s data by streaming a few videos over 3G.

Verizon is also throwing out the extra fees for using your phone as a mobile hotspot. That’s now included in the cost of a Share Everything plan if you add a smartphone that supports the feature.

If you opt for a data-only plan, you could grab three tablets and 8GB of data for $80 per month, or a tablet, a mobile hotspot and 8GB for the same price.

Share Everything plans will be available starting June 28th.

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10 replies on “Verizon Share Everything plan: 1 data plan for all your phones, tablets”

  1. $5/GB for (presumably unthrottled) data is actually pretty good, but the price for the first GB is pretty steep. Think of it as $40 monthly fee for data access and $10/GB for the first 2 GB…

    You might want to compare to Ting, a prepaid Sprint MVNO with a multi-device plan ($6/device, then you pay for minutes, texts and data you use).

  2. It’s just getting worse and worse. First, was getting rid of unlimited data. Now, they’re adding the new “feature” of shared data plans except most people would end up paying more with only a few who would actually pay a little bit less.

  3. This is a very minor improvement from the status quo. But hey it is improvement. Now if we could get rid of this fiction that they need data caps to protect anything but their bottom lines we’ll be in a better place as a society.

      1. Separate plans tact on additional fees that would get added on top of each other. So combining it under one plan means a lot of those additional fees don’t get duplicated anymore.

        You won’t save a lot but it is cheaper than the previous alternative as long as you take advantage of things like unlimited voice and text, along with no longer being charged for tethering that you previously had to pay a additional separate fee for on top of your phones normal data charges.

  4. Man talk about a million ways to skin a cat? I swear these phone companies just come up with new plans using the same freaking numbers to trick people into thinking they are getting a bargain when all it is is serving up the same old numbers under some new name on a new glossy piece of paper.

    Why hasn’t someone come up with a way to make these wireless companies charge an honest fee for an honest service. No wonder it is almost standard practice to root your smart phone and add tethering to your device.

    Instead of offering us crap why don’t they save all those advertising dollars and lower their freaking rates.

    1. Cellular companies not gouging customers is not gonna happen until another provider enters the market or some new technology emerges that will break the existing cellular companies’ oligopoly It’s like weaning ourselves off of foreign oil, Colombian cocaine, or junk food.

      The problem is that building infrastructure, the so called “last mile” problem, isn’t free or cheap. So any company that goes through the pain and financial risk of putting wires in the ground, or renting cell towers nationwide, which costs maybe $5+ billion, and absorbing the cash flow bleeding (perhaps $1 billion a year) until its customer base reaches critical mass, is going to want to extract its pound of flesh.

      WiMax was supposed to break the carriers’ stranglehold as it was touted to be WiFi on steroids. But if the consortium of supposedly savvy, well-heeled investors (Sprint, Clearwire, Intel, Google, Comcast, TimeWarner) couldn’t make this happen, it’s highly unlikely someone else can.

      1. The phone companies also spend tens of millions of dollars lobbying state and federal government every year to ensure that the status quo is maintained and, in some cases, get new laws passed to specifically protect their interests. Today’s head of the FCC is tomorrow’s high paid communications lobbyist and has zero interest in upsetting the apple cart.

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