Chinese equipment maker plans to launch a new USB thumb-drive sized computer, or internet TV accessory called the Enjoy Stick ATV100 by the end of the month. Charbax from ARMDevices.net got a sneak peek at the Computex trade show in Taiwan last week.

At first glance, the ATV100 looks a lot like the MK802 Mini PC that I’ve been playing with for the past few days. But Geniatech’s little PC on a stick has a few things that help distinguish it from the flood of similar devices that appear to be hitting the market this year.

First, it has an ARM Cortex-A9 processor which should offer better performance than the Cortex-A8 chip in the MK802.

Second, it has an IR port for use with a remote control — and you can plug in an extender so that if you plug the ATV100 into an HDMI port on the back of your TV or monitor you can run the IR receiver around to the front of the device so you can still use a remote control with the device even if you can’t see the ATV100.

There’s also a spot for an external antenna, which could allow the ATV100 to get better WiFi reception than some devices in its class.

The Geniatech Enjoy Stick ATV100 has an 800 MHz processor, 1GB of DDR3 memory, 2GB of flash storage, and runs Google Android 4.0 software. It has a full-sized USB port, a mini USB port, a microSD card slot, and HDMI output supporting 720p displays.

via CNX Software

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6 replies on “Geniatech Enjoy TV Stick ATV100: Android PC on a stick with ARM Cortex-A9”

  1. We’re living in exciting times that’s for sure, but I’m not entirely sold on these “PCs” yet. I’m still waiting for Atom performance level, ethernet, and a desktop OS of course ?

  2. Very cool. Assuming you can multi-connect USB devices (an external hard drive and a wireless keyboard/mouse), this would be just the thing to replace the aging Acer Aspire Revo for my living room TV. Er, at least if Hulu allows it as an “authorized” device.

    1. You’re AspireRevo may be aging, but it’s probably a lot more versatile than this. On the other hand, an ARM-based system would use less energy.

    2. If your aging Acer out performs say the middle of the road Android smart phones that came out last year as far as functionally and flexibility then I wouldn’t bother getting one of these. Also I’d wait till next year to look at these unless there is a strong argument for being an early adopter in your mind. I have seen at least three vendors in the USA alone offering something along the lines of something like this and you can already get these or similar on AliExpress.com though I haven’t seen one with an external antenna yet? So i suspect the price will fall rapidly even at the rock bottom prices these are supposed to be at ($70-100).

    3. Thanks for the comments. @imutau:disqus – I’ll check those out. I did look at some YouTube demo videos of the other Enjoy TV products, and they seemed to perform just as well as I’d need. Especially since the wireless on the Revo is completely dead, and now the HDMI port seems to be failing.
      @Brad – I’m honestly not using much PC functionality on my living room TV – already have a good desktop and laptop, along with the netbook and tablet. ๐Ÿ™‚ The Revo simply replaced an early-model AppleTV that didn’t have integrated Hulu or Netflix. I’ll put it this way – when the Eee Box in the basement blew up from a power surge a few months back, I replaced it with a $35 Sony SMP-N100. And it’s met every requirement for its companion TV. So something like this would work nicely in the living room, assuming Hulu “certifies” it. The reduced power consumption is part of the appeal.

      1. Makes sense. I recently replaced a Dell Inspiron desktop with a Core 2 Duo CPU in the living room with a lower power Zino HD with an AMD Fusion chip for similar reasons. But since I use my HTPC as a DVR I still need something that can handle a TV tuner and video transcoding (although with hard disk space getting so cheap, compression isn’t as important as it used to be).

        If I was primarily doing web video, an ARM-based system really could be enough.

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