Acer has unveiled two of the first tablets designed to run Windows 8. The Acer Iconia W510 features a 10.1 inch display and will run about $799 when it hits the market, while the Iconia W700 has an 11.6 inch screen and a $999 price tag.

Update: Acer has adjusted the pricing. The Iconia W510 will start at $599.99, while the Iconia W700 has a starting price of $799.99.

Both tablets will likely launch this fall… around the time that Microsoft officially launches Windows 8.

Acer hasn’t shared detailed specifications for the tablets yet, but here’s what we know so far.

Acer Iconia W510

Acer’s new 10 inch tablet offers a detachable keyboard dock with a built-in battery. When using the docking station together with the tablet, Asus says you can get up to 18 hours of battery life.

Acer Iconia W510

The dock can also be used as a stand — letting you rotate the tablet 295 degrees and use it for watching videos, displaying presentations, or other activities where you might not need to access the keyboard.

The tablet has an IPS, high definition display.

Acer Iconia W700

The 11.6 inch model has a full HD display Dolby audio, and 3 USB 3.0 ports.

Acer Iconia W700

It comes with a “multipurpose cradle” which lets you tilt the screen back 70 degrees for viewing or 20 degrees for touch navigation.

 

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6 replies on “Acer introduces 10.1, 11.6 inch Windows 8 tablets for $600 and up”

  1. I dont think people will buy a tablet that is more expensive than the Ipad. It does have a keyboard dock but I think it should be sold seaparately

    1. I think it depends on what the package has.  If that price includes the keyboard then I think the price is fine.  I would be willing to buy something like this for $800-$1000 if it means it can replace both my tablet (ipad/android) and my notebook (windows).  If the price is for the tablet only then I’m not sure.  I think Microsoft will market these as not just tablets, but fully functional Windows 8 machines capable of doing what your laptop can do AND perform just as well as a tablet.  That is something neither the iPad or Android tablets can claim.

      This is just my opinion, but compared to this ipads and android tablets are in an entirely different sub class.  They are going to look more like the toys (or big cell phones) that they are compared to Windows 8 tablets.  Of course it’s going to depend a lot on the Windows 8 tablet’s final performance (battery life, speed, heat, price, hardware, weight, etc.).  I’m looking forward to actual reviews because there’s always something that misses the mark.

    2. This is a whole new game, now.
      The only way Apple’s gonna make it is by proposing MacOS (and not only iOS) on their tablets.

      Even compare to Android, iOS is starting to get a bit old and… limited.
      We see Apple consumers feeling a bit cramped in an iOS environment/UI. 

  2. Asus on the 11th line too.
    As for the tablets. They are quite… pricey.
    And I suppose that these are the prices without the dock/keyboard.
    Curious to see if they have, at least, Ivy Bridge as ultrabooks do.
    And that’s no Metro but W8 (with an x86 chips then), right?

    1. Yes, the W series uses x86 processors and thus should be running Windows 8.

      Though they may be ATOM systems, like the present W500 with Windows 7.

      Could be either the upcoming Clover Trail, essentially dual core version of Medfield, or the updated Cedar Trail, which they’re coming out with 1.7GHz N2650 and 2GHz N2850 versus the present 1.6GHz N2600 and 1.86GHz N2800.

      Though they could have opted for one of the Sandy Bridge based Celeron/Pentium ULV chips like some updated Chromebooks are using.

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