When Asus rolled out its new line of netbooks in January, the company didn’t just introduce its first mini-laptops with Intel Atom Cedar Trail processors. The company also unveiled a new product design for its Eee PC laptops that drops the old “seashell” case design and replaces it with a “flare” design.

But the company is also updating some of its older netbooks with Cedar Trail chips, so you can have your Seashell and your Cedar too.

Asus Eee PC 1011CX

For the last few years Asus netbooks have followed a seashell-inspired design, which is another way of saying with the lid closed they were thin and pointy near the front, thicker at the rear, but with a rounded edge.

The new flare-style models such as the Eee PC 1025C and Eee PC 1025CE have a similar shape, but they also have a recessed keyboard area so that both the palm rest and the area above the keyboard are higher than the keys. Yeah, it’s not a dramatic change, but that’s basically the difference.

The Eee PC 1011CX is sort of a combination of the two styles, with a raised palm rest, but no raised area above the keyboard.

But what makes the netbook most interesting is that it basically takes a design used for last year’s Eee PC 1011PX and swaps out the Intel Atom N455/N570 Pine Trail processor for a new 1.6 GHz Atom N2600 Cedar Trail chip.

The change should lead to a slight performance boost while reducing energy consumption. Interestingly, Asus says both the Eee PC 1011PX and 1001CX should get up to 11 hours of run time. The difference is that last year’s model did that with a 56Whr battery while the new netbook uses a 48Whr battery.

The Eee PC 1011CX has a 10.1 inch, 1024 x 600 pixel display, a 0.3MP camera, VGA and HDMI ports, 3 USB 2.0 ports, and an Ethernet jack. It measures 10.3″ x 7″ x 1.4″ and weighs 2.8 pounds with a 6-cell battery. A lower capacity 3 cell battery is also available.

Asus says the mini-laptop will be available with 1GB to 2GB of RAM and either a 320GB or 500GB hard drive. It ships standard with 802.11b/g/n WiFi, while Bluetooth 3.0 is available on some models.

ExcaliberPC is taking pre-orders for a $259 model with 2GB of RAM and a 320GB hard drive, but no operating system.

via Netbook News.de

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17 replies on “Asus Eee PC 1011CX packs this year’s chipset in last year’s netbook”

  1. I own an Eee 1011cx and I’m 100% sure that runs fanless, the only thing that I want to know is the min – max temps of the processor, with temp monitor software and under stress test it hits 75 Celsius at max on one of the cores. By the way, I like a lot this notebook, it’s normally warm under high stress but not to hot instead of last generation Intel Atom PinTrail with fan dissipator. The point of these Cedar Trail is to accurate locate the processor and their heat dissipating components because in some netbooks it got really hot and uncomfortable, like Toshiba, but in this Asus there is no problem. I recommend this 1011cx 100%, more battery, more perfomance and fanless technology that guarantees a noiseless operation!

  2. ARE YOU SURE THE MODEL 1011CX IS LIKE ANOTHER N2600 FANLESS DESING?I AM INTERESTED TO BUY THIS MODEL 1011CX BECAUSE IS IMPORTANT FOR ME THE 6 CELLS BATERY BUT I LIKE VERY MUCH FANLESSS BUT I AM NOT SURE,IN THE ASUS PAGE THEY SPEAKS THE ARE FANLESS BUT I DONT SEE 0DB LABEL IN THAT MODEL AND I DONT FIND PICTURES DISASEMBLED MODEL TO BE SURE IT IS A MODEL FANLEES SOMEBOY KNOWS IF 1011CX MODEL COMES FANLESS?THANKS

  3. All these cedar trail n2600 posts miss the most important question, at least to me – is this design fanless?

    It should be, but if Asus is just using last year’s design, then maybe it isn’t.

    1.  Fanless, no, especially the models designs from last year that just update the ATOM to Cedar Trail.  So while the N2600 can go fanless, most will still include a fan.

      However, the new Cedar Trail systems run cool enough that the fans will either run at low speed or hardly at all.

      One reviewer of the upcoming Eee PC 1025C and 1025CE, for example, thought they were fanless as all he could hear was the hard drive clicking.  I quickly pointed out to him though that the casing still had the fan exhaust vent and that the FCC images of the interior still show a fan for both models.

      So only nettop systems with the new Cedar Trail chips have offered true fanless designs, so far…  While Intel only indicated the N2600 could go fan-less but we may have to wait for the upcoming Clover Trail chips to come out for a better push towards fanless designs.

      Especially since a lot of companies seem to be waiting on Windows  8 before really pushing newer netbook models.

      Not to mention we’re only a year away from 22nm Silvermont being released and providing a major update to the ATOM architecture and product lineup.

      1. 1025C being the new “Flare” design? Apparently those are actually fanless, or at least Asus directly advertises them as such on their Amazon product page: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0071N3AYC/

        1.  Amazon is not linked with Asus, the actual Asus page doesn’t make any mention of the fan.  Only states system has 10% better battery life.

          https://www.asus.com/Eee/Eee_PC/Eee_PC_1025C/

          https://www.asus.com/Eee/Eee_PC/Eee_PC_1025CE/

          While as mentioned, the FCC images of those systems internals show the fan and the case clearly still has the exhaust vent on the side.

          Though Asus could have a done a last minute change but only the N2600 was ever suppose to be able to potentially go fanless for netbooks but also as mentioned the review unit 1025C was configured with a higher powered N2800.

          1. Systems still do run cooler and whether or not the system has a fan, they are very quiet and you should only be hearing the hard drive most of the time.

            Though the 1011CX in this article is based on the older, Seashell series casing, and will likely be using mostly the same internal parts. So remains to be seen if it’ll be as quiet as the new Flare series.

          2.  Yes, there is no air exhaust vent on the side for that model.

            Though mind it’s thinner and can only accept up to 7mm thick drives, you still have to open the whole thing to gain access, and the X101 series is intended for lower cost and that means some cutting corners on things like performance and extra features.

            It’ll usually only come with a 3 cell battery for example.

    1. Easier said than done.  The Intel Sandy Bridge ULVs (i3-2357M, i3-2367M, i5-2467M, i5-2537M, i5-2557M, i7-2367M, i7-2657M, and i7-2677M) have a TDP of 17W; the N2600 has a TDP of 3.5W and the N2800, 6.5W.  It’s hard to fit a chip using nearly three times the power in to the same chassis.

      1. Can what’s done on 11.6″ ultrabooks that’s less than half an inch thick be done on 10.1″ netbooks that’s 1″ thick?

        1.  You’re not thinking in terms of volume, case thickness is only one factor in determining volume but it’s the whole space that matters, along with how it factors for the efficiency of air flow.

          10″ size systems simply don’t allow good enough air flow to deal with the heat generated by higher powered systems.

          Though it’s not impossible, but would require much better cooling system than normally used and that in turn means higher cost and even more power consumption.  Along with more things that can go wrong with the system with the increased complexities.

          1. If Panasonic can put a 35W TDP i3 in a 10.1″ notebook (1.53″ – 1.89″ though) for $1499 (HDD based) then using a 17W TDP chip should be easier. Maybe it’ll be closer to 1″ thick. If so, I’d still pay the same $1499 for such a device.

          2.  The Panasonic J10 series has been updated to Sandy Bridge, but the $1499 is just for the base configuration with Core i3, originally just 2GB of RAM and 160GB of hard drive but newer models can have 4GB of RAM and 250GB HDD.

            The higher end models can go up to Core i7-2640M 2.80GHz (turbo boost up to 3.5GHz) and easily more than double the price.The up to 1.89″ thick casing is the opposite of thin and shows how hard it is to squeeze such a high powered system into a 10″ system but the high price lets them use premium materials and is why it’s just 1.2KG (~2.66 pounds).It’s just the high pricing puts it beyond most consumers, especially those looking for netbook range pricing, which would mean a lower cost model would have to be even thicker with less premium building materials.Since Ultrabooks are pushing for lower pricing than has been traditional for Ultra Thin & Light laptops is why it’ll take a long time before you’ll see them go to the 10″ range…

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