Sony Tablet S opened up

The Sony Tablet S is an Android tablet with a 9.4 inch display, an NVIDIA Tegra 2 dual core processor, and an unusual wedge-shaped design. It’s been on sale in the US since last week, so it was just a matter of time before someone cracked the tablet open to see what makes it tick.

The folks at TechRepublic did the job this time around, and they’ve posted a series of photos to show what the tablet’s insides look like.

While Android tablets aren’t generally meant to be opened up the way laptops are, it turns out that all you need to do is remove two screws to open up the Sony Tablet S. The 5000mAh battery is relatively simple to replace — assuming you can find a spare. And while Sony is offering a WiFi-only model at the moment, there’s clearly a space for a 3G or 4G mobile broadband card. Ambitious hackers might even be able to add their own.

You can find more details about the tablet’s internal components including descriptions of all the different chips found inside the case at TechRepublic.

 

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2 replies on “This is what the Sony Tablet S looks like dissected”

  1. Feh, who cares…

    Sony will just brick it like it did the PS3 OtherOS with firmware updates if anyone tries to do anything with it.

    Anyone buying anything from Sony is an idiot or works for one.

    1. I am generally a content creator and manager rather than a consumer so I find the tablet form-factor useless… If I did get one of these it would be as a content consumption device, specifically for default firmware which is PlayStation certified.

      Not everything is as black and white as you make it out to be. Hackability is not a key point of this device – they are not claiming any hackability (unlike the PS3) so they can’t take it away.

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