CyanogenMod 7 on the HP TouchPad

Update 9/17/11: CyanogenMod now has WiFi working, audio partially working, and the accelerometer working. You can find a second video with more details below.

The independent developers working to bring Google Android to the HP TouchPad are making very fast progress. Just a day after the TouchDroid team showed off support for multitouch input on the tablet, a developer with the CyanogenMod team posted a video showing much, much more.

It looks like the touchscreen is working, the accelerometer is working, and graphics drivers are in place. One of the few things that’s not yet working is WiFi. The developer in the video is getting an internet connection over a USB cable.

Update: As of September 12th, the CyanogenMod team has basic support for WiFi and the beginnings of support for audio, but the project still remains a somewhat buggy work in progress.

HP’s tablet ships with the webOS operating system, but early reviewers complained that the tablet felt sluggish at times when running webOS, despite the fact that it has a fast 1.2 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor. But in this video, it looks like Android 2.3 Gingerbread runs about as well on the TouchPad as on any other smartphone or tablet I’ve seen.

Hopefully it won’t be long before CyanogenMod works out the kinks and uploads a build of CyangonMod 7 for anyone to download and install on the tablet. One of the best things about this particular project is that CM7 will dual boot with webOS, which means you won’t have to uninstall the original operating system to try out Android on the TouchPad.

Interestingly, the CyaongenMod developer claims that the TouchDroid team only managed to get the touchscreen working on the tablet by modifying a CyanogenMod driver, without giving credit where it was due. Team TouchDroid has a different take on the situation.

Update: While the CyanogenMod software isn’t yet available for download, you can install an early, partially functional version of Android on the tablet now. The TouchDroid development team has disbanded after a spot of controversy, but as a parting gift one of the members has posted the existing code along with instructions for installing it. Wireless isn’t working yet, the screen colors are all wrong, and there’s no support for hardware buttons on the tablet yet. You’re probably better off waiting for the CyanogenMod build, but for the first time it’s possible for anyone to install Android on the tablet.

Update 9/17/11: About ten days after releasing this video, the CyanogenMod team released an updated video showing even more features working. WiFi now seems to be fully supported, audio is partially supported, and the accelerometer works.

Unfortunately there are still a few issues. The tablet has a dual core processor, but for now CyanogenMod only uses one core. Audio is still a work in progress. And support for the Android Market is limited.

Support Liliputing

Liliputing's primary sources of revenue are advertising and affiliate links (if you click the "Shop" button at the top of the page and buy something on Amazon, for example, we'll get a small commission).

But there are several ways you can support the site directly even if you're using an ad blocker* and hate online shopping.

Contribute to our Patreon campaign

or...

Contribute via PayPal

* If you are using an ad blocker like uBlock Origin and seeing a pop-up message at the bottom of the screen, we have a guide that may help you disable it.

7 replies on “CyanogenMod 7 on the HP TouchPad: Nearly everything working”

  1. I’d love this if I could get an HP Touchpad for the retail price of $99. I have made so many orders but it seems like none of them are coming ack. I never thought much of these toy tablets but the price and the battery life on these about balance it out for me. Now if we can get an SD card bootable Ubuntu I’d be game if only I can just get one for non-ebay scalper prices. $240 is way too much for this.

  2. Wow, I can’t wait.  Android on the Touchpad was bitter-sweet for me because I like WebOS so much.  Dual-boot is just perfect!  I wish it was Honeycomb, but CM7 is not too shabby.

    1. The CM team will likely start working on an Ice Cream Sandwich build once the source code is available. I suspect someone more impatient might go ahead and try to create a Honeycomb build before then, but that’s trickier to do since Google has never publicly released the source code for Android 3.x.

  3. Dual boot CM7 and webOS 3.0 is like a dream come true!  I love community development! Now maybe someone could reverse engineer webOS onto other Android tablets…

    1. The CM team will likely start working on an Ice Cream Sandwich build once the source code is available. I suspect someone more impatient might go ahead and try to create a Honeycomb build before then, but that’s trickier to do since Google has never publicly released the source code for Android 3.x.

    2. No one in their right mind will bother reverse engineering webos, when android is open source. They are both on top of linux kernel though. It would be better to just modify the android UI layer to be a more webos-like.

Comments are closed.