A lot of folks have complained that the Samsung Galaxy Tab 7 inch Android tablet seems to have an unreasonably high price tag — especially when compared to the Apple iPad which starts at just $499. We’ve seen European product listings with prices of $950 or higher. But that’s the unsubsidized price. Now a leaked document is providing a hint at the going rate in the US.

The folks at TmoNews got their hands on a document suggesting that T-Mobile will offer the tablet for $649 in the US. That’s the full price for an unsubsidized Galaxy Tab. If you’re willing to sign up for a 2 year mobile broadband service contract you should be able to get the tablet for $399 after rebate — or about $100 less than a WiFi-only iPad.

For your money you’ll get a 7 inch tablet with a 1024 x 600 pixel capacitive touchscreen display, Google Android 2.2, a 1GHz Samsung Hummingbird processor, HDMI output, front and rear cameras, Bluetooth, WiFI, and access to the Samsung Media Hub software which lets you purchase and download movies and TV shows.

Other major US wireless carriers including Sprint, AT&T, and Verizon are also expected to offer the Galaxy Tab, and while we haven’t seen final pricing from those companies yet, I suspect they’ll be competitive. Of course, a leaked document isn’t exactly the same as an official announcement, so I wouldn’t bet the farm on T-Mobile offering the Galaxy Tab for $399 with a contract.

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6 replies on “T-Mobile USA Samsung Galaxy Tab pricing revealed?”

  1. Samsung’s missing the boat on this one… It looks like a cool new pricey toy… Great for school kids. But commuters and business people who can actually afford a gadget like this want useful devices that will combine some of the old ones we now have. They could have offered us a real “business companion”. I would use it on my commute. I also heard that the Euro version is much better… It even has a voice phone capability… The US version is a stripped down one… Only Skype capable…. I’ll use video chat when I want… I don’t want to be forced into it… Hearing someone is still ok. NO PHONE NO DEAL…

  2. I’m going to wait this one out. A year or so from now, a boatload of
    these devices will be available from the closeout web sites for pennies on the dollar.

    Anyone who has doubts can only look at what’s happening
    to eReaders that are Android tablets running eReader software,
    which provide pretty much the same thing except that they don’t run Froyo 2.2 or have access to the Marketplace. One such tablet,
    which was sold at Kohl’s for as low as $149, is being hacked
    by its user community to bring it up to Froyo 2.2. By the way,
    this device has a color screen.

    The pundits at ZDnet are predicting that only Kindle will survive
    the onslaught of the tablets (including iPad) on eReaders, and
    that the massacre will occur next year.

  3. This is juicy. First to market. Yeah, second, but really this is the first attempt at proving the tablet market exists outside of the iPad. I think tablet market is the iPad and the iPad only. A lousy US economy and price point for the Galaxy certainly = fail. I can’t wait to see how this story ends. All the others have their notepads ready. This success or failure will pave the way to a lot of scrambling. This is so juicy I can’t wait.

    gemaster
    aka gman

  4. The real problem for Samsung isn’t necessarily the iPad (although it’s going to be a tough enough sell against that already established device, and whatever the new model will be) but the lower cost seven and ten inch tablets from people like Archos and Notion Ink.

    There is nothing wrong with selling a high-quality tricked out tablet, but the greatest specs in the world aren’t going to turn it into a mass market device, especially if you have to buy an expensive contract to get it for a half-decent price.

    And I see a lot of people comparing the specs of the Tab with the inferior ones of the iPad (cameras, SD cards, USB, etc.) but perhaps with the exception of the camera (something everyone is betting Apple will fix with the next few months) most people don’t really care about that geeky stuff when they are shopping for that type of device. So in the end, I very much doubt the Galaxy Tab will be much of a success, unless they drop their prices considerably.

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