Last week Toshiba UK sent out a message indicating that the Toshiba AC100 Android powered smartbook would soon begin shipping. And now it looks like the UK might not be the only place where you’ll be able to get your hands on this 1.9 pound mini-laptop with an NVIDIA Tegra T20 chipset, 10 inch display, and Google Android 2.1 operating system.

French retailer Darty has started taking pre-orders for the Toshiba AC100, announcing that it’s expected to be in stock within the next 15 days. The smartbook has a 1024 x 600 pixel display, 512MB of memory, and a 16GB solid state disk. Darty is charging €299, or about $380 US.

Netbook News, meanwhile, reports that the Toshiba AC100 should begin shipping in Japan this Friday. While the device will launch with Android 2.1, Netbook News reports that an Android 2.2 upgrade should be available down the road. That could enable support for Adobe Flash.

via Blogeee

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3 replies on “Toshiba AC100 Android netbook headed to Europe any day now”

  1. Great hardware, and fairly affordable but the only thing holding me back besides unavailability in Australia is that there isn’t any community or real support around it.

  2. I’m super duper excited about the AC100 I can’t wait to get my hands on one of them. I love the styling I like the custom look Toshiba has on it and I really love how light weight and inexpensive it is. If smartbooks and tablets both catch on in the coming years netbook market growth is going to be stopped dead in it’s tracks.

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