Now that Intel has launched its Intel Atom Pine Trail platform, prepare to be inundated by reviews of netbooks sporting the new processor and chipset. The first to make the rounds is the new Asus Eee PC 1005PE, a slightly updated version of the popular Asus Eee CP 1005HA 10 inch notebook.

I’ve rounded up half a dozen reviews of this new netbook that hit the web last night. As expected, these reviews are as much about the new chipset as the new computer, although we’ll probably have to wait for a few more models to be released before we can start writing lines like “performance is pretty much what you’d expect from a netbook with an Atom N450 processor.” As many have pointed out, I probably could have saved a lot of time over the past year and a half if I’d written a macro that would spit out a line like that for the Atom N270 CPU.

  • Engadget – The new model scored slightly higher on most benchmarks than the Eee PC 1005HA and feels a little snappier. The most noticeable improvement is in battery life: It runs for 10.5 hours under everyday use.
  • CNET – You’ll save about $0.88 in energy costs, and performance is better than Atom N270 on some tasks, but lower than a dual core Atom 330 chip. But overall CNET seems disillusioned with the 10 inch, 1024 x 600 netbook form factor.
  • Laptop Magazine – The netbook has the same chassis as the 1005HA, but a chiclet-style keyboard. There were mixed results on benchmarks, and the Eee PC 1005PE still isn’t up to the task of serious gaming. Full screen Flash video from Hulu was also choppy.
  • AnandTech – The new model gets slightly higher scores in most of AnandTech’s benchmarks, but if you want a real performance boost, the site suggests going for a machine with an Intel CULV processor. They were underwhelmed by the LCD display, but very impressed with the 10+ hour battery life.
  • Notebook Review – These guys experienced slightly improved 720p HD video playback on the new model, but 1080p HD video is still out of reach. There’s no GPU acceleration for HD Flash video.
  • Tech Report – In a battery of benchmarks and real-world tests, the Asus Eee PC 1005PE performed pretty much the same as you’d expect from any older Atom powered netbook. but it came out way ahead in the battery life tests.

The Asus Eee PC 1005PE has a base price of $379 and it’s expected to begin shipping in the US in early January. For the most part, it sounds like the biggest advantage it has over the existing Eee PC 1005HA is improved battery life. While Asus claims the notebook will run for up to 14 hours, real-world tests show you’re more likely to get 10 to 12 hours. That’s still pretty impressive though.

If you were expecting improved HD video playback or a significantly faster processor, you’re not going to find it here. Still, it doesn’t look like you’ll lose any performance, and you will pick up a bit of battery life. If you already have an Asus Eee PC 1005HA, there’s little reason to upgrade. But if you’re in the market for a new machine, the 1005PE looks like  good option.

Here’s a rundown of the computer’s specs:

  • Display: 10.1 inch, 1024 x 600 pixels
  • CPU: 1.66GHz Intel Atom N450
  • Chipset: Intel NM10
  • Graphics: Integrated GMA 3150
  • OS: Windows 7 Starter
  • Memory: 1GB, 667MHz DDR2
  • Storage: 250GB, 5400rpm HDD
  • Battery: 6 cell, 63Whr
  • Dimensions: 10.3″ x 7″ x 1.0~1.4″
  • Weight: 2.8 pounds

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12 replies on “Asus Eee PC 1005PE (with Pine Trail) review roundup”

  1. i want one too… my sl410 is fast… great keyboard by heavy and the battery is only 2.5 hours max

  2. Too bad Asus is not as green, as they were with the 1000H (I beleive it was?). In that model you could change both the harddrive and the RAM without voiding warranty – by removing the bottom plate with 2 screws.

    Ever since they dropped this option, I have gone for the Lenovo S10. Only issue with the S10 is the annoying variable fanspeed that constantly change, and the max 1.5 GB of ram.

    I’m am typing writing this not too advertise for Lenovo, cause I want asus back. – but I think it sucks that they dont offer that option anymore. It would make me buy less units, cause I sure would like the ekstra battery life and the slightly more horsepower it offer. I simply want the old unit to be used as a small fileserver, or perhaps a backup unit for later usage.

  3. Off to Anandtech then! If anyone is going to do a proper review, they will.

  4. As expected, Pinetrail is overrated. Might come in handy with ION and battery suckage but nothing more. More battery is great, but since when does a new chip release not offer up dick for improved performance? Lame imo. Really lame. Pinetrail only seems relevant or worth mentioning if it’s with ION, but even then, let’s wait for some tests on those battery life improvements.

    1. Overhyped by who? Intel never promised better performance, and I’ve written
      at least a dozen articles explaining that it wouldn’t offer better
      performance.

      There have *always* been more powerful processors available that could be
      slapped in 10 inch notebooks for better performance. But what makes them
      netbooks is the low price combined with small size.

      1. I know they didn’t promise anything, and the gains in power efficiency are nice and all but, I need a tweener product. CULV would be great if they could get graphics on it that could compete with a discrete card released this decade (that’s an overstatement but not by much). The minute that happens there’s a price premium that puts it up over $700 dollars. ION is nice but it’ll be Q3-4 next year before we see a product with ION2, and who knows what the markup for that will be?

        I honestly believe that netbooks are going to revolutionize computing. They’re just too portable and handy. They’re what laptops should have been all this time. I think big system replacement laptops are kind of like SUV’s, we just don’t NEED them for everyday use, but a nice portable, where I can keep up with everything is too handy. If it could also allow me to do some light gaming, and 3d design… Well then, there you go.

        I don’t need a replacement for my desktop, I’m quite happy with it. I need a replacement for my 15.6″ 8 pounds with power charger ‘portable’, but it still needs to meet my needs, and however close Pinetrail and CULV are, they just don’t.

      2. It’s not a question of being overhyped. It’s a question of what the typical consumer out there would expect. A new processor that isn’t faster? wtf? It’s a pretty weak excuse for releasing a new processor if all you’re getting is a few more hours from an already amazing battery life to begin with. Pinetrail is much about nothing. At least it is to those who follow details like this. Um, which is a tiny tiny percentage of the netbook market.

  5. What you say? You slept last night?
    This close to CES?
    Your not scheduled for another sleep break until 1/12/10 –
    On the plane ride home. 😉

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