toshiba 1.8

Toshiba’s latest hard drive is both really big, and really small. On the one hand, it can hold up to 320GB of data, which hardly makes it the highest capacity hard drive for mobile devices. But it’s better than the 160GB and 250GB hard drives that come with most netbooks. But at just 1.8 inches, the 1.8 inch hard drive is small enough to fit in an iPod or a super-thin netbook. (The original HP Mini 1000 had a 1.8 inch hard drive in order to keep the netbook less than 1 inch thick).

The new Toshiba MKxx33GSG series of hard drives have spindle speeds of 5400rpm and 16MB cache. In other words, they’re also a lot faster than the 4200RPM hard drive used in that original HP Mini 1000.

The hard drives are also available in 250GB and 160GB versions.

Toshiba is also releasing a cheaper model, the MK1235GSL, which can hold 120GB and which has a spindle speed of 4200RPM.

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3 replies on “Toshiba introduces 320GB 1.8 inch hard drive”

  1. fit into a super thin netbook? I think it would be great for making a netbook even more portable. It might put it in the high end of the netbook price range but it might be worth it depending on what one uses the netbook for.

  2. I’m guessing teh reduced size means reduced weight too? If that’s the case ist comes down to cost to decied if ist worth it to you.

    On interesting effect is you don’t have to go SSD to reduce the weight anymore. Even if these small HDDs cost more they are likely still a far better deal for cost-per-megabyte then SSDs.

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