Acer Aspire One D250 with Google AndroidAcer is set to release a new version of the Acer Aspire One D250 soon with both Windows 7 and Google Android loaded up. You can choose between the operating systems at launch. And Acer has been busy sending out demo units to a handful of tech news sites (although someone at Acer apparently forgot to put me on the list). Here’s a short roundup of sites that have managed to get their hands on the Android enabled version of the laptop:

  • Laptop Magazine – Android boots in 30 seconds and looks good on the large screen, but the UI is clearly designed for phones, not laptops.
  • Register Hardware – You actually have to boot Android first and then choose the “switch OS” option to load Windows, which seems silly.
  • Pocket Lint – There aren’t any keyboard shortcuts to support Android features, so you have to navigate with a touchpad and the Esc button.
  • The Mirror – The laptop will be available in the UK on October 22nd for £279.
  • ZDNET UK – Android supports email, chat, web browsing, and generally looks like the Smartphone version.

The long and short of it is that it looks like Acer kind of slapped Android on an existing netbook without spending much time ensuring that the hardware/software combination actually makes any sense. But hey, it’s two operating systems for the price of one… or something.

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9 replies on “Acer Aspire D250 with Google Android starts making the rounds”

  1. It would be interesting to see how it compares to Chrome OS that Google is working on. Using the comments from other sites, Android does not seem very appealing.

    It would be neat to try both Android and/or Chrome OS on my netbook. I think Android would be more of a phone os while Chrome is more for a computer?

  2. I’d prefer one without Windows 7 on it. The whole “cheap netbook” trend faded and the devices doubled in price when they moved from Linux to WinXP……and we were once again left with no choice.

  3. This is a pretty lame interface that’s not really worth anything nor is it am I excited about the OS that looks as it should be on a mobile phone. Not visually stimulating enough and pretty useless.

  4. No keyboard nav? UI designed for phones and not laptops? I think this wraps up why Asus said earlier this year that it was not going to be releasing anything on Android at this point. We can put an end to the Microsoft-paid-them-off theory for now.

    Still, there are some interesting pluses there. With some more work in this direction v2 or v3 could be a serious winner as a near-instant-on OS.

    Overall, I think Moblin is a lot more interesting for x86, however.

  5. Finally, a unique computer offered by a major manufacturer!

    Two operating systems out of the box is almost unheard of.

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