archos 10

You may have noticed that practically ever netbook running Windows has the same specs: 1GB of RAM, a 160GB hard drive, probably an Intel Atom processor, and a 9 or 10 inch display. That’s largely because Microsoft is offering low cost Windows XP licenses to PC makers selling netbooks that meet these specifications. It helps keep the costs down while providing netbook makers with an operating system that’s been proven to work well on low power computers.

But you know what else works well? Ubuntu Linux. And you don’t need to handicap a PC to include a copy of the free and open source operating system. A handful of companies have offered Linux netbooks that have additional RAM or other features. And now Laptop Spirit reports that Archos has launched a version of the Archos 10 netbook with Ubuntu Linux, 2GB of RAM, and a 500GB hard drive.

The netbook still has the same 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 CPU and Intel 945GSE chipset found in other Archos 10 models. It also has a 10.2 inch, 1024 x 600 pixel display, a 1.3MP camera, 802.11b/g WiFi, 3 USB ports, and a 6 cell battery. It weighs 2.9 pounds and measures 10.2″ x 7.4″ x 1.1″.

The Archos 10 Ubuntu Edition is available now from Surcouf for 375 Euros or about $525.

via ArchosFans and Netbook News.de

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12 replies on “Archos launches Ubuntu netbook with 500GB hard drive”

  1. Another company offering a Linux netbook with more than 1GB RAM:

    https://www.kogan.com.au/shop/kogan-agora-netbook-pro/

    This could easily become more and more common as it begins to dawn on OEMs that if they offer better hardware specifications and a better OS with a full set of applications for the same price, people will buy it if they are offered it, even if it isn’t Microsoft.

    Apart from bigger disks and more RAM, another possibility is better processors, perhaps dual core or even quad core ARM CPUs could be the go here.

  2. Well, even if M$ is the big bad evil guy, he is not alone…

    The maker of the almighty Atom chip is also responsible. They also put restrictions on the HW design when selling the chip. Some of Intel commandments are…

    – Thy shall not have larger screen size then 10.2 inch
    – Thy shall not have a digital video out connection
    – Thy shall not have a digital audio out connection

    (Some of the restrictions might be removed now)

  3. The irony is heavy here. . . Until now some Linux netbooks tended to have less RAM and storage because Linux generally doesn’t require as much as XP. Now we may see some Linux-based netbooks go the opposite direction — because they’re *allowed* to.

    With low-spec ARM-based netbooks on one side, and high-spec X86 Linux netbooks on the other side, it looks like Microsoft have staked out the middle ground — and are setting themselves up to be surrounded.

  4. Sounds like a nice netbook. Too bad I am not in the market right now. I would love to support them in their effort with Linux.

  5. When quoting European prices, you need to take into account EU prices include 25% VAT Tax, which thus means the price in $US is most probably going to be in the same area of $375 when they release it in the US market.

    By the way, which “handful of companies have offered Linux netbooks that have additional RAM or other features”? I haven’t heard of any other company doing this. The only other Linux netbooks I have seen are the ones that lower the price of the netbook such as the Flash memory based Acer Aspire One 8.9″ netbook, yet Acer has decided to discontinue it cause lower cost netbooks means lower profit margins and even Acer and Asus aren’t too happy about that.

    1. @Charbax
      Look outside America.

      The cheapest lowest spec netbooks are/were available in America, but there are more available with Linux at the same or in this case, better spec in other countries. Perhaps Microsoft’s influence is not as strong outside the US, or perhaps the Linux market is stronger in other countries.

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