shuttle-x50

Shuttle is officially launching the all-in-one touchscreen computer that the company first teased us with back in January. The Shuttle X50 PC is the first product in Shuttle’s new X Vision line. The computer has a 15.6 inch touchscreen display, a dual core, low power Intel Atom 330 CPU, 1Gb of RAM and a 160GB hard drive.Β  It supports up to 2GB of RAM, but since this computer ships with Windows XP Home Edition, Shuttle can’t get away with selling it with more than 1GB without getting on Microsoft’s bad side.

The X50 also has 5.1 channel audio, aΒ  4-in-1 card reader, a 1.3MP camera, and 802.11n WiFi.

This little machine would probably make a halfway decent media center system, if you’re happy with a 15.6 inch display. If you need a bit more oomph, there’s a VGA port on the back of the unit and a 5 USB ports scattered around the sides. You can check out an image of the back and side of the computer after the break. Shuttle hasn’t made the pricing official yet, but word on the street in January was that this computer would sell for $599 with Windows XP or $499 with no OS installed.

What do you think? Would you buy a Shuttle product over similar all-in-one touchscreen computers from Asus and MSI? Or are you baffled at this whole new cheap, low power touchscreen desktop craze?

via SlashGear

shuttle-x50-2

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8 replies on “Shuttle introduces all-in-one desktop with dual core Atom CPU”

  1. Awesome! That is what I want, an inexpensive net-top computer with a touchscreen. I will NEVER be baffled a whole new cheap, low power touchscreen desktop craze! The only thing that would baffle me is if people don’t grab onto this idea and buy one.

  2. I think nettops make a LOT of sense… sans monitor. Media PC, random closet server, etc. There are a lot of uses for a small, low power/heat, cheap PC but most of them don’t need a built in monitor… dump the monitor and drop the price below $200 and sell them as the 3rd or 4th computer you need around the home. πŸ˜€

    1. I totally agree with you on this one, a nettop w/o monitor make a lot of sense. but I think youre $100 off mark on the price -> https://www.linuxdevices.com/news/NS9634061300.html

      1.2GHz ARM
      512 MB RAM
      512 MB flash storage
      Gigabit LAN
      1x USB

      and there you have it, $100 closet server/torrent box (+external HD) or whatever one might need a 3rd/4th pc for. πŸ™‚

      Not powerful enough to be your media box, but still good enough for most of t he tasks of a closet server.

  3. I’m thinking a touchscreen Nettop with a simple UI would be perfect for my technophobic parents who, because they live 90 minutes away, miss out on a lot of what my siblings and I exchange in the way of photos and e-mails of things that seem a little mundane to call up the folks about.

    Something like this could even be kept in a cupboard only to pulled out and powered up when needed.

    Of course, I’d have make sure they have a reliable wireless router so I can remote desktop in for those times they “just clicked something and it stopped working” πŸ™‚

  4. I agree with okeribok. It seems everyone’s standard for comparison is a big desktop beast that can run Game X at some screaming mips or flops or refresh rate or dpi. Rather, as soon as these netbooks can come down to $200-300 with ‘popular’ software (Microsoft, ugh), we’ll either see a flurry of mainstream advertising and buying of them, or Microsoft will find a way to horn in on the deal and price them back out of our bedrooms and kitchens.

  5. Is this supposed to be in the kitchen?

    The touchscreen seems a bit useless when you’re writing on an upright canvas.

  6. Craze? What craze 8O)
    The level of perfomance on this should be on par with what was current in 2005. So you could do about 90% of household stuff on it, except for GPU-intensive games. Bottom line is, it’s good enough and costs the same new as four year old used computers, but uses way less power and is cuter. What’s not to like?
    I predict households having one big processor monster with beastly storage in the basement and all familymembers using netbooks for everything, and when they need powerrr, they just borrow cycles from the monster in the basement. Or run VNC or something. Big screen requirements? HDTV. Gaming? console.
    PC = dead, long live netbook & nettop.

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