1000he-v-aod150

The Asus Eee PC 1000HE and Acer Aspire One AOD150 each have a 10 inch display, an Intel Atom processor, and a low price tag. The Eee PC 1000HE is available for pre-order for $374 while the Aspire One AOD150 is already shipping for $350. So which one to buy?

Well, that’s entirely up to you. But the folks at Asus have put together a little presentation comparing the two computers. The leaked documents appear to be aimed at distributors and retailers, and of course they’re highly biased. But the Eee PC 1000HE has a larger keyboard, touchpad and palm rest than the Acer netbook.

Asus is also emphasizing the long battery life the Eee PC 1000HE provides. It has a battery that should run for up to 7 hours, while the Acer Aspire One AOD150 ships with a ower capacity battery that will likely run for about 4 to 5 hours on a charge.

Of course, the Acer netbook is cheaper. And while you can preorder the Eee PC 1000HE for $374, the price is expected to jump to $399 once the notebook starts shipping.

thanks Ivan!

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15 replies on “Asus Eee PC 1000HE vs. Acer Aspire One AOD150”

  1. Acer is not shipping with lower capacity battery. Got mine yesterday with 5800mAh battery…approx 8 hours normal use.

  2. lol… nice math

    53 mm vs 59.4 = 112% larger???

    I guess 350$ vs 400$ = 144% more expensive hahahaha

    It was suposed to be 11 % larger and 12% more expensive. I think someone needs to find a new job because they make asus look outright stupid…

  3. It’s not whether or not Linux is an option, it is more to the point of not having to pay the “Microsoft Tax”. By not having Windows XP Home installed the price could be reduced by at least $50 USD. I think the perfect option would be to have a model with no OS installed and let it be the option of the end user to decide. I am on my 3rd netbook and it is irritating to pay for an OS that I will remove just moments after taking it out of the box.

    1. They only pay 20$ per license, but I agree they should give you the option of a linux version right of the bat. I think that is probably part of the agreement with microsoft. I bet they can’t ship dual booting machines as well as part of the agreement.

      I would like a dual boot right of the box. Too bad that linux can’t read NTFS otherwise it would be easy to share a data partition between the two OS. I guess you can use fat32 but well… that was developed for windows 95 lol

      1. “Too bad that linux can’t read NTFS”

        That’s where you’re definitely wrong.

  4. I think these two models will be the front line of the battle of the netbooks. Aside from some very minor differences from other brands and models, these two represent the standard configuration today. The netbook market has become a commodity since everyone is bowing to Microsoft’s restrictions on netbook design parameters. Acer has now become a viable option with this model by fixing the design flaw from the previous model by giving easy access to the hard drive and ram with bottom panels. Asus will have to hope they can retain market share by being the “trendy” model like the mystique Apple marketing has. But unfortunately, in a commodity market, all is driven by price and that is why I think Acer will win this battle. Possibly with the coming battle of pricing one of these manufacturers will be intelligent enough to release one of the models with Linux.

    1. How much does it matter whether or not a manufacturer installs Linux, if buyers know that it is easy to install a distribution themselves and distributions that work for the particular netbook are readily available? I honestly don’t know the answer.

      1. Some of us don’t like paying the “Windows Tax”, i.e.: money to Microsoft for an OS we will never use.

  5. Yeah, well the Acer is separated by universes from the Samsung when it comes to price too. Once you cross the $450 mark, it’s no longer a netbook, it’s a cheapo sub-notebook. Also, most laptops are getting glossy screens, so it’s just something that gadget users are going to have to deal with. I wonder if he wishes they’d make a matte-finish iPhone just for him. But WTF, Acer? No brown? For shame. At least I’ve got my AAO-150 in Brown.

  6. I chalk this up to the language barrier but that should say 49% & 12% Larger (or something like 149%/112% sized) Larger is amount its bigger than and shouldn’t include the original’s 100%…

  7. Don’t know why people would get so bent out of shape about the touchpads. I have no problem with the postage-stamp sized touchpad on the original Aspire ONE, but even so, I only use it when I have to. Get a notebook BT mouse for crying out loud, easy to carry and you’ll be much happier with it than with ANY touchpad.

    I’m sure they’re both nice machines, but did Asus also mention that the Aspire ONE, like some other netbooks, has a normal full-size right shift, while Asus persists with their ridiculous tiny button you have to hunt for because they refuse to make the proper cutout for the arrow keys on their friggin’ “larger” keyboard? Or that the new ONE is coming out solidly cheaper than the rock-bottom prices for the old model only a month ago, while the Eee line is boggling the mind with their price increases?

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