HTC’s first 64-bit smartphone is also its cheapest phone with 4G LTE

As expected, HTC is launching its first smartphone featuring a 64-bit processor based on ARMv8 architecture. And as expected, it’s a mid-range device rather than a phone with bleeding edge specs.

The HTC Desire 510 is powered by Qualcomm’s 1.2 GHz Snapdragon 410 processor, making it the first phone announced to feature Qualcomm’s new entry-level chip based on ARM Cortex-A53 technology. But we’ll have to wait until 2015 to see Qualcomm’s faster processors based on ARM Cortex-A57 designs.

Meanwhile, other specs for the HTC Desire 510 certainly paint a picture of a phone that’s more exciting for its expected low price than for any other reason.

htc desire 510

The HTC Desire 510 features a 4.7 inch, 854 x 480 pixel display, 1GB of RAM, and 8GB of storage. It has a 5MP rear camera, a 0.3Mp front-facing camera, a microSD card reader, 802.11n WiFi, Bluetooth 4.0, and GPS.

The phone supports 4G LTE and GSM/WCDMA 2G and 3G networks and it’s powered by a 2100mAh battery. The HTC Desire 510 runs Google Android 4.4 KitKat with HTC Sense software including BlinkFeed and support for HTC’s Dot View case.

Pricing and network support will likely vary by region.

  • tk76

    Odd. Younhave your first 64bit phone have only 1GB of RAM?

    • Michael Thompson

      1gb is still pretty standard on a mid range phone.

      • tk76

        Won’t apps use more memory running 64 bits, or is that just a misconception?

      • CyberGusa

        Unfortunately, it’s generally true, but the establishing of 64bit is mainly future proofing at this stage as the software needs to support it for continued development but it can’t do that if there’s no hardware for it to develop on…

        The old chicken and the egg style conundrum… It all has to start somewhere…

        While, early pitfalls like memory shortage is countered by generally better performance, improved security and software stability, etc. and it’s not like people buying mid and low range devices aren’t already used to limiting what they do as even the present 32bit systems can have issues with running out of memory with just 1GB available…

        However, they’re mainly waiting for the eventual switch to LP-DDR4 to really start pushing higher memory capacity…

        Presently, memory capacity is help back in mobile devices due to a combination of cost, space, and power usage that would noticeably affect battery life… All are important considerations for a mobile device but LP-DDR4 will allow for smaller space usage and better power efficiency… While costs should initially be higher but should quickly go down as it becomes the new standard…

        All of which is suppose to happen sometime towards the second half of 2015 and on through 2016…

        Even Intel will support LP-DDR4 for the Broxton update that’s suppose to come out towards the end of 2015 or early 2016…

        In the meantime… it’ll be mainly pricier tablets that we’ll see larger capacity RAM offered first for now… with Phones maybe going up to 3GB as a interim capacity offering for the high range devices…