Intel unveils thin, fanless tablet reference design based on Broadwell

Intel plans to launch its next-generation Core processors later this year, and they’re not just for notebooks and desktops. The company unveiled a new reference design for a super-thin, fanless tablet during a keynote at the Computex Trade show.

The reference design features a 14nm “Broadwell” processors which Intel says represents a new category it calls Intel Core M. It’ll be the most energy-efficient member of the Intel Core processor family when it hits the streets, and it allows for thin and light devices with passive cooling.

intel broadwell tablet

Intel’s tablet design features a 12.5 inch display, measures 0.28 inches thick, and weighs less than 1.5 pounds.

It’s also a 2-in-1 device, which means that you can attach the tablet to a keyboard dock to use it as a laptop. That’ll make it a bit thicker and heavier though. Intel says there’s also a “media dock” which boosts performance and adds cooling.

Intel says the Core M chip is just the first of the company’s new Broadwell-based designs made specifically for the growing 2-in-1 PC market.

Here’s a picture of the media dock (and some Broadwell boasts) from Engadget and the keyboard dock, from UMPC Portal.

  • mike

    It’s interesting that they have a dock which boosts cooling/performance. So basically they are saying that this new best-of-class chip in terms of energy efficiency can be used in super thin devices with passive cooling – but it will be thermally bound and throttled to do so.

    still potentially very impressive that they can get a core based part into such a package. Will be very curious to see how it compares with other platforms in such cases.

  • Nighty

    So for the dock they basically just took a page out of AMD’s book (though there’s a good chance their dock reference design will make it to market.

    Now, as this is a Core M device, which is a new designation, it remains unclear to me what they mean by 10%~40& better performance. Compared to what? The atoms used in the same form factors? Or Core chips at the same clock speed? It’s ambiguous at best I must say.