Chrome browser for Android gets enhanced audio, video, communication tools

Google is bringing more features from the desktop Chrome web browser to Chrome for Android. Chrome 29 Beta is now available for desktop and Android devices, and the update brings support for the Web Audio API and WebRTC to Chrome for Android.

In other words, you can use Chrome on your phone or tablet for video conferencing or playing web-based musical instruments, among other things.

Chrome for Android with WebRTC

Both features had already been available in Chrome for Windows, Linux, OS X, and Chrome OS. But Google seems to be on track to bring most of the features from its desktop web browser to mobile devices.

I’m still holding out hope that we’ll get support for browser extensions one of these days.

For now, we’ll have to content ourselves with support for a new JavaScript API for web apps that process and synthesize audio and a technology for web apps that support real-time communications such as video chats.

Sure, you could already do those things using mobile apps for Android. But if we’ve learned nothing else from Chrome OS, it’s that Google believes in a future where the web browser may be the only app you need (which works out nicely for Google, since the company makes most of its money by placing ads on websites).

Chrome 29 Beta also brings improvements for desktop users, including improved Omnibox suggestions and stability and performance tweaks.