Acer unveils Aspire R7 notebook, desktop convertible

Plenty of PC makers have blurred the lines between notebooks and tablets this year by offering Windows computers that can function as either. Acer’s going another way with the Aspire R7. It’s a notebook that you can use as a tablet, or a desktop PC.

Acer Aspire R7

At first glance the Acer Aspire R7 looks like a typical notebook. You can close the lid and carry it around with you. But when you open the lid you’re greeted with an “Ezel” style display.

You can use the computer like a laptop, with the screen facing the keyboard. But you can also flip the screen over the unusual hinge so that the display is facing the back of the computer, allowing you to use the machine as a sort of all-in-one desktop.

Or you can flip the screen so it faces outward and then close the lid so the screen is facing up — which makes it work like a tablet.

Acer calls the four different modes “notebook mode,” “pad mod,” “display mode,” and “ezel mode,” with the last mode offering a sort of hybrid approach with a touchscreen resting partially over the keyboard.

Perhaps the oddest thing about the design is the touchpad which rests above the keyboard, and which isn’t accessible at all in notebook mode.

ar7_06

The computer runs Windows 8 software, has a full HD display, Dolby Home Theater audio, and support for 3D gesture-based controls that let you interact with the PC without even touching it.

It packs a 15.6 inch, 1920 x 1080 pixel display, an Intel Core i5 processor, 6GB of RAM, a 500GB hard drive, and a 24GB solid state disk.

The computer has a backlit keyboard, three USB ports, VGA, HDMI, and Ethernet jacks, and WiFi and Bluetooth.

Weighing about 5.5 pounds, it’s a bit heavy for a notebook, but awfully light for a desktop.

The Acer Aspire R7 will ship May 17th for $1000 and up, and it should be available for pre-order from Best Buy shortly.

Update: As tsog points out in the comments, the Acer Aspire R7 may not be the first notebook with this unusual hinge style. Flybook launched a similar device half a decade ago, although that model has an 11.5 inch display, an Intel Core 2 Duo processor, and Windows Vista.

via NewGadgets.de 

  • jb82

    Really bad design. Idea is pretty interesting but really poorly executed. I am always wishing my laptop screen could go a little higher when I am at my desk but don’t want a large monitor etc permanently on my tiny desk.

  • http://twitter.com/V_U vēer

    I like the idea, not sure how well the design will work in real life and how sturdy it will be, I hope they worked on it(the hinge) the way that it wont wear out in a year or two essentially turning this into humongous monster tablet-only…
    Portable desktop replacements that can work like any device out there are welcome, its great when you can have separate tablet at home and then also your main desktop machine has all the funcitonality that your small tablet has, except for the weight and mobility of smaller units.
    It looks bulky when in tablet mode tho, thats what Im most concerned about, then again, this is essentialy a laptop and the rest comes as nice, really nice and hopefully usable bonus!
    Im not concerned about touchpad being above keyboard given that it has touchscreen+Im mostly using mice.
    My 2c

  • tsog

    The hinge mechanism looks an aweful lot like the one on the Flybook VM from 6.5 years ago:
    http://www.techpowerup.com/21463/Flybook-VM-a-notebook-with-a-twist.html
    http://flybookdirect.co.uk/flybook-VM.html

  • http://www.facebook.com/ElisabethLiora Elisabeth Liora
  • toronado455

    Interesting. But is it really that difficult to turn a conventional notebook computer around so your co-worker can see the screen? Talk about solving a problem no one thought they had.