Tronsmart T428 TV stick with RK3188, Android 4.2 now available

One of the first Android TV sticks with a Rockchip RK3188 quad-core processor is now available. Geekbuying reports that the Tronsmart T428 is ready to ship. The store is selling the stick for $99.

Tronsmart T428

Like other Android TV sticks, the Tronsmart T428 is a device about the size of a chunky USB flash drive. But instead of a USB connector at one end, it has an HDMI port. Plug it into your TV, hook up a power source, and you can use it to run Android apps on your TV.

This model features a 1.8 GHz RK3188 ARM Cortex-A9 quad-core processor, ARM Mali 400 quad-core graphics, 2GB of RAM, and 8GB of storage. It runs Android 4.2 Jelly Bean and features built-in 802.11b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0.

There’s a full-sized USB port which you can use to connect a keyboard, mouse, game controller, or other peripherals. There’s also a micro USB port for pwoer and a micorSD card slot for extra storage.

Geekbuying is sending me a demo unit to test, but in the meantime you can check out the retailer’s demo video below.

  • obarthelemy

    Does it output true 1080p ? The RK3066 only do 720p, unless you use iffy hacked ROMs

  • Zaatour36

    Those Android Mini PC have came along way

    Really fast and snappy, can’t wait for RK3188 media hub with many ports

    Hope to see your review soon:-)

    • http://soltesza.wordpress.com/ sola

      Yes, progress has been incredible. And there is no sign of slowing down.

      Soon, we will see the first Chinese A15 SOCs (a 40% boost compared to the A9).

      I also favour the set-top-box form factor

  • Cláudio Sampaio

    Is there any Linux support or even unofficial Linux image? I ordered one of those but what I really want it Linux running on it. Android is boring.

    • http://soltesza.wordpress.com/ sola

      I am afraid this is too early for RK3188 based sticks. There is some Linux support for RK3066.

      Unfortunately, Rockchip is a very Linux-unfriendly company. They only support Android on their hw and don’t provide any documentation or source code for facilitating Linux. It is a pity, because they seem to produce fairly good products.

      However, as Wayland and Mir is gearing towards working directly on top of Android drivers, future desktop-Linux ports are becoming easier. We will see the first results of this soon.

  • Supre
  • J.M. Becker

    @Cláudio Sampaio: I apologize if you’re already in the loop, but I wanted to mention just in case it’s helpful. Generally Linux on ARM is horrific, as ARM boards lacks an industry standardized pre-boot environment (AKA BIOS/UEFI), getting Linux on a fresh device is essentially embedded development. This combined with very hit or miss graphics support, and even more spotty manufacture documentation , makes for an unusually difficult process. Being that it’s still possible to run linux on these devices, communities crop up around particular devices. I HIGHLY recommend find a community which is properly supporting a device in particular. Another unfortunate consequence of this requirement, most supported devices are early generation chipsets. This is not across the spectrum, but just what I’ve experienced broadly, so just look carefully. Think of this as running Linux pre-2000, where everything must be fully investigated for compatibility, …So yes this will eventually run linux, with differing degrees of manual embedded development, compiling kernels with custom patches, and then packaging components for some semblance practical usability. If you intend to run a distribution, with actual pragmatic usability as your concern, identify which boards in particular are distribution supported … It really will make a worlds of difference.