Kobo Arc tablet will come with up to 64GB of storage

Kobo has updated its Arc line of Android tablets… which is interesting, because they haven’t actually hit the streets yet. The Kobo Arc is a 7 inch tablet with a 1280 x 800 pixel display and Android 4.0 software.

When Kobo first introduced the tablet earlier this month, the company said it would be available with 8GB to 16GB of storage for $200 to $250. Now Kobo says the tablets will be available with 16GB to 64GB of storage, with prices ranging from $200 to $300.  

Kobo Arc

The Kobo Arc features a 1.5 GHz TI OMAP 4470 dual core processor, which is the same chip used in the Amazon Kindle Fire HD 8.9. It has an IPS display for wide viewing angles, a 1.3MP front-facing camera, and 802.11b/g/n WiFi.

While the tablet will ship with Android 4.0, Kobo says it’s already working on an Android 4.1 software update.

And while tablets from Amazon and Barnes & Noble ship with those companies’ own app stores, the Kobo Arc will come with the Google Play Store (as well as the Kobo eBook store, of course).

Here’s the pricing breakdown for the new tablet:

  • 16GB model for $199.99
  • 32GB model for $249.99
  • 64GB model for $299.99

All three models will ship in November, with pre-orders starting before that.

On paper, this all sounds pretty good. The Kobo Arc may not have the high resolution 1920 x 1200 pixel display of a Kindle Fire HD 8.9 or Asus Transformer Pad Infinity, but that might be overkill on a 7 inch tablet.

Kobo’s last tablet, the 7 inch Vox, didn’t get particularly strong reviews from critics, but gdgt users have been a little more forgiving. The Arc looks like a big step up, with a better display, faster processor, and significantly more storage.

via Android Central

 

  • Tarwin

    Their tapestry software looks quite interesting (if not perfect) and I have to say that their browser’s ebook style/format reading function for web pages that makes them easier to read seems quite good in the hands on video from the launch event. It actually makes me feel tempted to get one despite the lack of quad-cores, kraits (or maybe quad-core traits soon) to be found in other tablets.

    Though truth be told if I had to choose from a ereader based tablet I’d most likely go with this one due to its purer android software with access to the app store (so I don’t have to rebuy the programs I already bought, plus it means you can install the kindle and nook apps if you really want).

    My only criticism from what I’ve seen (I haven’t seen how the software really handles yet) is that the ereader mentality means that the stereo speakers and camera are geared towards portrait use (which is fine for listening to music and maybe skyping but not for movie watching as the stereo effect is lost).

  • Tarwin

    ^by the “if not perfect” I meant to say that it is definitely not perfect(ed) yet…