Lenovo IdeaTab S2110 tablet with optional keyboard up for pre-order

The Lenovo IdeaTab S2110 is an Android tablet with a 10.1 inch display and an optional keyboard docking station. We first spotted this tablet as it slid through the FCC website last month, and now it’s available for pre-order from Amazon for $399.99.

You can also order the tablet with the optional keyboard included for $499.99.

Update: You can now buy the tablet from Lenovo for $343 and up.

Lenovo IdeaTab S2110

The tablet has a 1280 x 800 pixel display and a 1.5 GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor. It runs Google Android 4.0, and features 1GB of RAM and 16GB of storage.

According to Amazon, the tablet measures 10.2″ x 7″ x 0.34″ and weighs 1.3 pounds. It supports 802.11b/g/n WiFi and has a 5MP rear-facing camera. There’s no mention of the front camera, but the photos of the tablet clearly show one.

The optional keyboard dock sports a full QWERTY keyboard, a touchpad, and status LEDs. It also appears to have a few USB ports, letting you connect extra peripherals to the tablet.

It’s not clear if the dock has its own battery, allowing you to extend the Lenovo IdeaTab S2110′s battery life the way an Asus keyboard dock lets you extend the battery life of a Transformer Pad tablet by using the keyboard to charge the tablet.

thanks Paul!

  • NoOne

    I like these concepts for combining tablets and keyboard docs. I think the tradeoffs are still horrible for emulating a full desktop experience on the tablet, but I think this extends the functionality of the tablet.

    This is the long way of saying I’m conflicted about devices like these. On the one hand, they’re ridiculously under powered, even compared to ultrabooks which are a bundle of tradeoffs that don’t seem reasonable to me either. That said, my iPad2 offers a very good experience, and a keyboard dock definitely enhances that experience…

    The tablet with dock looks more practical to me than a netbook, because having the ability to just have a tablet is transformative, especially if you can still get work done. But it very much is in that bracket where you wouldn’t want one as your primary computer. The issue I have is that they don’t seem to have really worked out the kinks yet, and iOS and Android are limited when it comes to emulating a device that really begins to look like a traditional clam shell style machine. That said, Win8 has issues too. I guess the real issue is that $500 is a lot of money for me right now to pay just so I can be a guinea pig with no guarantees that this device will be supported in the future or have a viable upgrade path, let alone applications designed to work within the trade offs this device poses. This is especially true since Google has publicly come out and said that this isn’t the direction they see Android going even though not pursuing it seems asinine.

    I guess I’m just leery of the entire market segment right now. It feels like we’re on the edge of this convergence between mobile and laptops, and it isn’t at all clear what systems are going to win out right now. It isn’t to me at least, so betting with my own money, the time I’d have to invest to learn the device, and ultimately how to develop for it, isn’t something I’m willing to do.