Commodore OS brings classic design to Linux Mint

The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit computer that launched in 1982. It offered a whopping 64 kilobytes of RAM and earned a soft spot in geek hearts for its advance audio and graphics capabilities.

Next to today’s computers it looks like a piece of junk, but the folks at Commodore USA are developing products for the nostalgic set. The company offers a modern computer designed to look like a Commodore 64. And Commodore USA is also working on a new operating system designed to emulate a bit of the look and feel of the classic computer’s OS.

Commodore OS Vision

Commodore OS Vision 1.0 Beta 9 hit the streets this week. It’s based on Linux Mint, which means it can run most apps that are available for Mint, Ubuntu, or other popular Linux distributions.

But the operating system has been skinned to offer Commodore 64-like graphics. There’s also built-in support for Commodore 64 software emulation, letting you run 8-bit, 16-bit, and 32-bit apps designed to run on actual Commodore computers.

Like most modern Linux distributions, Commodore OS Vision comes with internet, office, and media player apps preloaded, but it also features media production software including the GIMP image editor, Openshot video editor, and Linux MultiMedia Studio music production software. There are also a number of video games available.

via DistroWatch

  • http://profiles.google.com/martin.cohen Martin Cohen

    How about Amiga????

  • mabinogi

    The C64 Didn’t _have_ an OS. Just a BASIC interpreter, while on blue with a blue border text screen. So basically, they’re bundling VICE with Mint, and giving Gnome a blue colour scheme?

    “But the operating system has been skinned to offer Commodore 64-like graphics.” – that has to be the Worst. Idea. Ever.

  • http://twitter.com/RetroZoneUK RetroZone (UK)

    What do you mean? “Next to today’s computers it looks like a piece of junk”. A Commodore 64 is not a piece of junk. It was the world’s best selling computer and is still used today by thousands of computer users.