HP introduces its first business ultrabook, the EliteBook Folio

The EliteBook Folio is HP’s first business-class ultrabook. It has many of the features we’ve come to expect from consumer-oriented ultrabooks including a thin and light design and solid state storage.

But it also has enterprise security features as well as one item that’s nearly impossible to find on an ultrabook: a user replaceable battery.

HP EliteBook Folio

The notebook has a 14 inch, 1366 x 768 pixel matte display, weighs 3.6 pounds, and measures 0.75 inches thick.

That makes it a little lighter than the HP Envy 14 or 15 ultrabooks, but a little heavier than the HP Envy SpectreXT.

HP has packed 3 USB 3.0 ports into the EliteBook Folio, including one that functions as a charging port.

The notebook also features a DisplayPort, VGA and Ethernet ports, a Smart Card reader and fingerprint scanner into the case. The Elitebook Folio also has an embedded TPM security chip and supports full volume encryption.

The notebook has a backlit keyboard and a 4 cell, 52 Whr battery that’s removable. HP also offers a 6-cell, 60Whr battery slice which you can attach to the bottom of the notebook for up to 20 hours of battery life.

While HP’s consumer ultrabooks which will launch with second generation Intel Core processors and receive Ivy Bridge updates later this year, the EliteBook Folio will ship with Ivy Bridge.

Unfortunately it won’t actually be available for purchase until October. HP expects to sell the notebook for $1149 and up.

The notebook features two memory slots with support for up to 16GB of RAM. HP will offer hard drive and solid state disk options, with support for up to 500GB of storage with a 7200RPM hard drive or 256GB with an SSD. If you go the hard drive route, there’s also an option for 24GB or 32GB of solid state cache.

  • someone

    Wow, if they managed to slip a full voltage Ivy Bridge processor on there, that might actually be the first ultrabook I want to own and use, instead of just to own and club someone to death with at the coffee shop. For only 4 cells that’s not a bad number of watthours on the battery either… And it’s removable! Wow. This might not suck.

  • ldrn

    Wow, indeed. The screen resolution is too low… but your key specs are a bit off — the pictures clearly show it has the trackpad *and* HP’s version of the trackstick. Trackstick on an ultrabook… that makes it tempting.

  • guy

    Anyone know if the 11.6 or 12.1 inch elitebooks have the 3612qm?

    • aden

      I’m surprised traditional ultraportables aren’t getting covered while “large” ultrabooks do. They’re more “liliputing” type devices to me.

      • http://www.liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

        It’s a price thing… I was reluctant to cover ultrabooks at first because of their high price tags. Liliputing’s focus has always been on affordable ultraportables.

        But since these are what PC makers are pushing as mainstream devices, I’ve been paying attention to ultrabooks… and the starting prices are starting to come down.

        In this case, the Elitebook Folio is significantly cheaper than other members of the HP Elitebook lineup.

        We do also cover non-“ultrabook” ultraportables such as the HP Pavilion dm1 and Asus Eee PC 1225B, but I’m still primarily interested in models with reasonably low price tags.

      • A Guy

         I didn’t know price had a factor in your coverage. It’s actually disappointing as a reader. I would have thought the HP EliteBook and Lenovo X200 series ultraportables aren’t overly priced though.

  • HorribleDisplays

    These “ultrabooks” (thinbooks would be more accurate) all seem to have terrible 1366×768 screens. Why won’t any vendors offer better screens, at least as an OPTION? 1366 x768 might work for the MBA 11.6, but at 14-15″? No.