Lenovo IdeaPad S110 Cedar Trail netbook coming soon

Lenovo IdeaPad S110

Lenovo has posted a promotional video on YouTube for an unannounced netbook called the IdeaPad S110. While the video doesn’t make any mention of the processor, the folks at NewTechnik spotted a retail listing for the S110 which suggest it will have an Intel Atom N2600 Cedar Trail processor and run about $320.

According to the video, the IdeaPad S110 has a keyboard that’s 98 percent the size of a full-sized keyboard, measures 0.6 inches thick, and weighs 2.5 pounds. It looks like Lenovo didn’t make room for mouse buttons though. The left and right buttons appear to be integrated into a small touchpad below the keyboard.

The Lenovo IdeaPad S110 will have a 10.1 inch HD display, USB 3.0, WiFi, optional 3G, and an optional 2MP, 720p webcam. It has USB 3.0, a VGA port, and will come with a choice of red, blue, black, or white lids.

I wouldn’t be surprised to see this mini-laptop show up at CES in January. There’s no word on when it will actually ship.

The S110 will likely replace the IdeaPad S100 which 10 inch netbook which is no longer available from Lenovo.com, but which you can pick up from Amazon for $299.

  • chapelhillice

    Been playing with a Netbook since Christmas.  Honestly, half the people who have tablets (and I have a Touchpad) have no idea what their missing … with a real keyboard and the faster processor of a netbook, you can really do a lot of things better while sitting on the couch.  Emails and FB postings, watching Netflix … much quicker and smoother.

    • JakeT

      I agree. I hope more innovative designs and features come to the netbook market. I’ve tried the iPad and Transformer. Even for just media consumption and internet browsing, I found both very lacking in support for both.

      • Mathew

        I really hope so too. Maybe the Samsung Series Slider with enhancements from the Series Slate.

      • Marcismo

        I’d be interested in an upgraded version of the Samsung Slider from last year’s CES. Though, I can’t really say upgrade since I don’t think it was ever released. A slider design is much better than Dell’s flip screen tablet. That just added to the bezel size which made the netbook larger overall and killed one of the benefits of getting a netbook.

      • Farokh

        I’m not interested in the Lenovo but I sure am about the Samsung Slider with current gen enhancements. Active digitizer with silo or bust.

      • PikTik

        These mobile OS based tablets really aren’t worth the money.

    • Aaron Hockett

      Netbooks for what they are is a cheap, low cost alternative (read that as sub $300) to higher powered 12.1 notebooks with decent processors have their place.  Atom powered netbooks/notebooks (even the one I’m typing on, a 1201N) comared to my TF101 are about the same, difference being one has a touch screen. 

      I think what people need to realize is that tablet, netbook, notebook or laptop, the choice is ultimately personal and while one is generally prefered over another, this does finally show that Intel is trying to (finally) catch up with AMD in the mobile segment.

  • Anonymous

    Netbooks & tablets are different things for different purposes. There is overlap but tablets are essentially media consumption devices and netbooks are for light computing tasks, like wordpressing, email, etc. There is a place for both.

  • JTC

    I’m wondering whether this will be available in the US and western Europe.  Both Toshiba and Lenovo made Atom N550 Netbooks, but only made them available outside of the US.

  • Matti

    Decent bits of kit, these IdeaPads. I’ve got an old IdeaPadS10-2. Upgraded memory to 2GB, replaced the included HDD with a 40GB Intel SSD and put a lightweight Linux distro plus tiling window manager on it.  The thing flies. Boots in around 10sec and does all the things I need it to, which is mostly browsing while listening to music and a lot of editing with Vim. Decent stock battery life (for it’s time) and improved further with some undervolting (via Linux-PHC). I used to get about 8 hours of use (6cell), though it’s a bit down now after 2.5 years of constant use.

    Admittedly not a handy as a tablet if all one needs is browsing and media consumption, but it does the job well enough. The smartphone takes care of my on-the-go browsing, email and IM needs.