Samsung launches Galaxy Tab Android tablet on all 4 major carriers

Samsung has officially announced that the Galaxy Tab 7 inch Android tablet is coming to the US — in a big way. The Samsung Galaxy Tab 7 inch Android tablet will be available through AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon Wireless.

The Samsung Glaaxy Tab has a 1GHz Samsung Hummingbird processor, a 1024 x 600 pixel TFT touchscreen display, and it will run Google Android 2.2. It has two cameras, one facing the front and another facing the back. Not only is the Galaxy Tab the first Android tablet to be announced for all four major US wireless carriers, but it’s also one of the few Android tablets to ship with full access to the Google Android Market — because in a lot of ways it’s really just a large smartphone, capable of making phone calls and thus meeting Google’s requirements for Android Market access.

Samsung will offer a series of accessories including a Bluetooth keyboard, a docking station with HDMI output, and a car dock which you can use to turn the Galaxy Tab into a 7 inch GPS and entertainment unit.

We’re still waiting for pricing, which will be set by wireless carriers. The tablet will arrive in time for the holiday season, and possibly sooner. Samsung also promises to release a WiFi-only version of the Galaxy Tab “in the future.”

Update: The US version of the Samsung Galaxy Tab will not be able to make phone calls. At launch, the US versions will also have 3G and WiFi capabilities, but there won’t be a WiMAX version for Sprint or any other carrier.

Update 2: Verizon says the tablet will be available “in the coming weeks,” while Sprint says it will offer the Galaxy Tab “this fall.” AT&T says it will have the Tab “in time for the holiday season,” and T-Mobile says it will be available “this holiday season.”

You can check out some images from the Samsung Galaxy Tab launch event after the break.


  • ShineBox

    > The tablet will arrive in time for the holiday season

    Ugh. I was hoping a release was eminent. This sucks. And unfortunately Samsung is going to lose its first-mover status. And since this device doesn’t have a Tegra2 processor, I’m now starting to look at the other devices that are on the verge of dropping before Christmas.

    Way to shoot yourselves in the foot, Samsung.

    • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

      It’s possible that the tablet could be available much sooner — it’s just the at the only thing Samsung officially said was that you’d be able to pick one up from each of the four carriers by the holidays — and don’t forget, the holiday season keeps starting earlier and earlier. :)

      I suspect the timing at this point is really going to be up to the telecoms.

  • Anonymous

    Is it 10″ inch or 7″ inch?
    It says 10″ on first line, and 7″ in the rest of the post.
    Maybe there’s two tablets being released?

    • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

      Nope, just a typo.

  • Anonymous

    What is this garbage about the US versions not be able to make phone calls? What is the source on that? This was the primary reason I was to choose this over the Streak.

    • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

      Actually, the Streak can make phone calls. If that’s a priority for you,
      you’re probably better off with a Dell. The source is a Samsung exec
      responding to a direct question at tonight’s press event.

      • LCB

        Brad, doesn’t this technically make the Tab not eligible for Android Market in the US, as it’s not a phone? Or will Google get very technical for a large OEM and still allow it because technically it COULD make a call, it’s just been disabled.

        What a bungle, regardless.

      • James

        This is what Google says about telephony features:

        Android 2.2 MAY be used on devices that do not include telephony hardware. That is, Android 2.2 is compatible with devices that are not phones. However, if a device implementation does include GSM or CDMA telephony, it MUST implement the full support for the API for that technology. Device implementations that do not include telephony hardware MUST implement the full APIs as no-ops.

        So if Samsung uses those mobile broadband chips made for notebooks that don’t have telephony capabilities then it still meets Google Android compatibility requirements. If Samsung just disables the telephony features through software then it does not meet Google’s requirements. At least that’s how I read it.

        http://source.android.com/compatibility/android-2.2-cdd.pdf

      • LCB

        James,

        I was speaking more to Google Apps and Android Market access. That’s been set as telephony-devices only by Google thus far. Non-telephony devices like the Archos tablets don’t have any phone capability whatsoever, so they are Android-compatible, but don’t get Google Apps or Android Market access.

        Your quote is a little more bothersome even for the Tab. Unless Samsung is introducing new hardware revisions in the US with all telephony capability literally not present (which I have to think is pretty darn unlikely, and if they do, it’s going to be a nasty surprise for some buyers thinking they can hack on Euro firmware and get voice capability), the Tab going to be a telephony-capable piece of equipment with that part of it crippled. That would seem to break Google’s rules for Android compatibility entirely depending on how you define “including” telephony capability.

      • James

        The Android CDD spells out all the requirements for Google to consider putting Google Market and other Google apps on a device. The other requirement is that the manufacturer has to submit an application for the Google apps and based on legal and business issues Google will approve the device.

        The Archos tablets don’t include a lot of stuff. As stated in the CDD, telephony is NOT required for Google Market and apps but the OS must respond to calls to it by apps. From what I can tell, Archos does not implement this properly. The CDD states that all non-required hardware must still have their APIs implemented to return nulls and do proper no-op functions.

        So making calls is not required to have Google Market and other Google apps.

      • James

        Here’s another quote from the CDD:
        A typical example of a scenario where these requirements apply is the telephony API: even on non-phone devices, these APIs must be implemented as reasonable no-ops.

        Here’s a quote from their compatibility page:
        However, if a manufacturer wishes to use the Android name with their product, or wants access to Android Market, they must first demonstrate that the device is compatible.

        Google provides a Compatibility Test Suite (CTS) and Archos tablets obviously failed this test. Their tablets are missing more than just telephony hardware.

    • Anonymous

      This was the primary reason I was to choose this over the Streak.

      I’m with you. I like the looks of the Streak, but when I read the first review of the Tab a couple of weeks ago, I quickly dropped my intention of picking up the Dell over the new Samsung offering. I’m disappointed to learn about the lack of phone calls in the latter.

  • Josh

    Will it have HSPA+ for T-Mobile USA? If so, I’d get it.

    I guess making phone calls isn’t a requirement for getting the Google apps. Hopefully not being able to place calls will make the Galaxy Tab cheaper in the US compared to other countries.

  • Anon

    Will a Wifi only version be available for those that only want it for Wifi use… some of us still use old cell phone because we get 3 days battery vs 1/2 day that typical “does-everything” smart phones get.

  • geep

    “Update: The US version of the Samsung Galaxy Tab will not be able to make phone calls. At launch, the US versions will also have 3G and WiFi capabilities, but there won’t be a WiMAX version for Sprint or any other carrier.”

    Than why in the world would phone carriers handle this product…what is in it for them….I am confused about this whole Samsung Galaxy tablet thing….looks like a group sexual encounter to me

    • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

      Like the iPad, you’ll be able to sign up for a 3G data plan to use the tablet anywhere covered by your network of choice. And like with the iPad, the carriers are going to use this as an opportunity to get you to pay more money *on top* of your existing phone contract, since you can’t use the tablet as a phone number. So there’s plenty of incentive for the carriers to distribute it. I’m a little less certain that there’s much incentive for customers — but we’ll see what happens when the telecoms are ready to start talking price.

      • Anonymous

        Brad: there seems to be a lot of confusion about the devices’s ability to make calls. You write that “the US version” won’t be able to do so. Does that mean that Samsung does make a Tab distributed elsewhere (say, Europe) that IS call-enabled? Also, do you know if a US user can get around the lack of a phone feature via the use of a third party app (ie, VoIP?).

        I think the Tab looks like a very worthy competitor to the iPad IF it comes with a phone (I can’t be the only person who would rather use one device instead of two). But without call-making capacity, I just see it as slightly more expensive iPad with an inferior screen.

      • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

        The Tab is available in Europe with phone capabilities. In the US, that feature will not be available.

        Samsung showed off the tablet making a video call over Fring or a similar service — but said that this will only work over WiFi. They haven’t explicitly ruled out using VoIP apps, but I suspect that carriers will impose some sort of limits on use of VoIP apps over 3G.

        Of course you’re not the only person who would rather have one device and pay one phone bill — but there’s not currently a lot of incentive for wireless providers to offer that kind of service when they can theoretically make more money with two devices and two subscription fees.

        My question is… if this strategy flops, will they call tablets a failure altogether, or will they start to ease restrictions on the phone calling features?

      • Anonymous

        …but there’s not currently a lot of incentive for wireless providers to offer that kind of service when they can theoretically make more money with two devices and two subscription fees.

        No doubt you’re right; I’m sure ATT, Verizon et al would just LOVE to train US consumers to get into the habit of paying for multiple subscriptions rather than simply buy service for a single device. But apparently in Europe wireless providers have enough “incentive” to allow consumers this option. Funny, that.

      • I2fun

        In Uk they “3″ Three network that only uses 3G and they would rather sell you data, but it can be used any way you want. For phone service or a dongle connected to your netbook, slate or laptop. You can use Skype to make and receive all your calls with a leased number. You can also use Google Voice in Gmail on your smartphone. Even when you run out of voice minutes as with all free services, like MSN and texting. Texting is much cheaper and in fact all cell phone services are cheaper in UK than here. Where they get you though is roaming. But on Three Net no problem with the widest 3G coverage in UK!

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  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_R6KKIKOG57FWYWW5DURB3GHVOE Stven Hord

    Samsung will offer a series of accessories including a Bluetooth keyboard, a docking station with HDMI output, and a car dock which you can use to turn the Galaxy Tab into a 7 inch GPS and entertainment unit.

  • Ajkbagh1

    I think its cool.

  • Tezzly

    All Rumors… Samsung is advertising that it will be able to make calls. This article does not have any real facts!

    • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

      I’m Europe it will be able to make calls. In the US it will not.

      Sent from my phone

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  • http://www.sunlightbattery.co.uk panasonic

    Samsung showed off the tablet having a picture call over Fring or a alike divine service — but said that this will only work over WiFi. They acceptn’t explicitly ruled out applying VoIP apps, but I surmise that carriers will enforce some sort of boundaries on use of VoIP apps over 3G.

  • Hansesm2

    Can someone help me? I’m not at all into technology but I would like to purchase an e-reader that can I can access my email with. A tablet seems like the answer but I’m confused about how to choose between carriers. I don’t want it for any other purpsose so why do I need a carrier at all?

    • http://liliputing.com/ Brad Linder

      I’d look at something more like the Barnes & Noble NOOKcolor which is an eReader that also has a working web browser. It’s $250 with no monthly fees, making it much cheaper than something like the Galaxy Tab.